View Full Version : The Shootist (1976)



ethanedwards
January 1st, 2006, 09:23 PM
THE SHOOTIST

DIRECTED BY DON SIEGAL
PRESENTED BY DINO De LAURENTIIS
PRODUCED BY M.J.FRANKOVICH/ WILLIAM SELF
MUSIC BY ELEMER BERNSTEIN
PARAMOUNT PICTURES

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/aB00005JSGL01LZZZZZZZ.jpg..http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/bwayne25.jpg
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/brianwaynestewart.jpg..http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/cjohnwayne316.jpg

Information from IMDb

Plot Summary
J.B. Books, a 60ish gunfighter, finds that he has stomach cancer and two months to live
. He takes a room with Bond Rogers and her son, Gillom to wait until death comes.
Of course, his very presence starts off events in the town.
The Marshal comes, prepared to die in a shootout, Gillom tries to idolize him,
Bond first is disgusted and then pitties him.
Then, realizing that he will die in great pain,
he comes up with an idea to go out with a bang.

Full Cast
John Wayne .... John Bernard Books
Lauren Bacall .... Bond Rogers
Ron Howard .... Gillom Rogers
James Stewart .... Dr. E.W. Hostetler
Richard Boone .... Mike Sweeney
Hugh O'Brian .... Jack Pulford (faro dealer at Metropole Saloon)
Bill McKinney .... Jay Cobb (owner, Cob's Creamery)
Harry Morgan .... Carson City Marshal Walter Thibido
John Carradine .... Hezekiah Beckum (undertaker)
Sheree North .... Serepta (Books' ex-girlfriend)
Rick Lenz .... Dan Dobkins (reporter, 'Morning Appeal') (as Richard Lenz)
Scatman Crothers .... Moses Brown (liveryman)
Gregg Palmer .... Burly man
Alfred Dennis .... Dearden (barber)
Dick Winslow .... Streetcar driver
Melody Thomas Scott .... Girl on streetcar (as Melody Thomas)
Kathleen O'Malley .... Schoolteacher
Johnny Crawford .... Books' victim in flashback (uncredited)
Christopher George .... Books' victim in flashback (uncredited)
Leo Gordon .... Books' victim in flashback (uncredited)
Charles G. Martin .... Murray (the bartender) (uncredited)
Ricky Nelson .... Books' fellow lawman in flashback (uncredited)
James Nolan .... Gambler (uncredited)
Henry Slate .... Pulford confidante (uncredited)
Ralph Volkie .... White-haired bartender (uncredited)

Writing Credits
Glendon Swarthout (novel)
Scott Hale (screenplay) and
Miles Hood Swarthout (screenplay)

Original Music
Elmer Bernstein

Cinematography
Bruce Surtees

Stunts
Denny Arnold .... stunts (uncredited)
Jim Burk .... stunt double, stunts (uncredited)
Steven Burnett .... stunts (uncredited)
Roydon Clark .... stunts (uncredited)
Chuck Roberson .... stunts (uncredited)
Henry Wills .... stunts wrangler (uncredited)

Trivia
This was John Wayne's final film.

While this is marked as James Stewart's final appearance in a western movie, he did lend his voice to the cartoon movie An American Tail: Fievel Goes West (1991), where he voices an aging hound dog sheriff named Wylie.

John Wayne greatly admired director Don Siegel and had said he would like to have played Clint Eastwood's role in Dirty Harry (1971). Wayne was never actually offered the part however because of his age, although he later made two cop movies of his own.

There had been some opposition to the casting of John Wayne, since the producers thought that at 68 he was too old to be believable as a gunfighter.

Contrary to popular belief, John Wayne did not have cancer when he made this film. His entire left lung and several ribs had been removed in surgery on 16 September 1964, and in 1969 he was declared cancer free. It was not until 12 January 1979, almost three years after this movie had been filmed, that the disease was found to have returned.

When viewing footage of the final gunfight in the bar, John Wayne saw that it was edited to show him shooting a guy in the back. He said, "I've made over 250 pictures and have never shot a guy in the back. Change it." They did. However, Wayne had shot men in the back in several of his movies, including The Searchers (1956).

To add a sense of realism to John Wayne's character, archive footage from several of his westerns was used to introduce J.B. Books after the beginning credits. Included was footage from Red River (1948), Hondo (1953), Rio Bravo (1959) and El Dorado (1966).

When J.B. Books (John Wayne) arrives at Dr. E.W. Hostetler's (James Stewart) office, Hostetler mentions that it has been 15 years since they last saw each other. The inside joke is that Wayne and Stewart last worked together on The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), 15 years before.

John Wayne was only cast as Books only after five other star names had passed.

John Wayne fell ill with influenza during the production and was hospitalized for a fortnight. It was uncertain at one point whether the film would actually be completed.

John Wayne was great to the Carson City locals while he was staying at the Ormsby House Hotel during the filming. He signed autographs for young people readily, including one signed for future famed Nevada Opera lead mezzo soprano Mary Anna Replogle.

The title of the film comes from a famous quip by the gunslinger Clay Allison. Allison, a bounty hunter and hired killer whose marksmanship and drunken, homicidal rages made him feared across Texas, would reportedly tell anyone brave enough to ask that he was employed as a "shootist".

John Wayne liked working with Lauren Bacall in their first film, Blood Alley (1955) so much that he hand-picked her as his leading lady for this film.

George C. Scott was originally offered the role of Books, and accepted it on the condition that not one word of the script be changed. However, the role was given to John Wayne after he expressed interest. The producers claim they had wanted him all along, but did not believe he would be interested in the film.

An interviewer asked Ron Howard if John Wayne had given him any tips on acting. He said that, during the filming of the final shootout, Wayne took him aside and said he had some advice for him. As Howard eagerly awaited some profound advice, Wayne said "Ron, if you want to look menacing - close your mouth."

John Wayne did a TV Public Service Announcement for the American Cancer Society that began with a clip of the scene in which the doctor tells Books he has cancer.

Maureen O'Hara was considered for the role of Bond Rogers, but director Don Siegel felt she wasn't suitable for the part.

Lauren Bacall's character's first name was a reference to Ward Bond.

At the beginning of the seventh day, Gillom whistles a Scott Joplin song made famous to audiences three years earlier in The Sting (1973).

The engraved Colt Single Action Army revolvers used by J. B. Books in this film were in reality a pair of 1950's-made replicas p

'Hugh O'Brian (I)' wanted to be in the film, so he was given the character of Pulford, who was originally in the novel. Pulford was a card dealer. In the movie, his gun fight with a patron is depicted as occurring after Books comes to town. In the book, however, the gun fight took place much earlier.

The name of Scatman Crothers's character, Moses Brown, is an allusion to the McCandles Ranch cook played by Bill Walker in Big Jake (1971).

Despite receiving generally favorable reviews, the movie proved to be one of John Wayne's least successful movies ever on its release.

Although now widely regarded as one of the finest final movies of any star, along with The Misfits (1961) starring Clark Gable and On Golden Pond (1981) starring Henry Fonda, this was never actually intended as John Wayne's last movie, particularly since it was not until January 1979 - three years after filming had begun - that he was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In July 1978, after recovering from open heart surgery, he announced that he was intending to make a movie called "Beau John" with Ron Howard, but for some reason it never happened.

The movie has often been compared with The Gunfighter (1950), a part John Wayne had wanted to play but which had instead gone to Gregory Peck.

James Stewart only agreed to play a cameo role in the film because John Wayne had specifically requested him. His short time on the film proved to be trying. The bad acoustics of the huge, hollow sound stages worsened his hearing difficulties, and he stayed by himself most of the time. He and Wayne muffed their lines so often in the main scene between them that director Don Siegel accused them of not trying hard enough. Wayne's reply was a variation on an old John Ford line, advising the director, "If you'd like the scene done better, you'd better get a couple of better actors." Later on, the star told friends that Stewart had known his lines, but hadn't been able to hear his cues, and that in turn had caused his own fumbling. Because Stewart's movie career had ended several years before, he was only paid $50,000 for his part.

After 47 years in Hollywood, John Wayne did not film a picture in the year 1975. Production on The Shootist (1976) started in January 1976.

Final film of Buzz Barton.

Two years prior to the release of this film, Richard Boone, Harry Morgan and Rick Lenz had co-starred in the NBC television series, "Hec Ramsey" (1972) which was also set in 1901 and depicted the fading of the Old West and the coming of modern law enforcement.

SPOILER: The original screenplay had Gillom Rogers (Ron Howard) shooting and killing J.B. Books (John Wayne). In the screenplay, the killing disturbed Gillom so much that he throws away the pistol and leaves the bar, repulsed by the act. Wayne had the screenplay changed so that Books is killed by the bartender, who is then killed by Rogers.

Goofs
* Crew or equipment visible: In the final shooting when the bartender shoots Mr. Books, the squib detonation wires are visible on the ground and leading up each man's leg.

* Crew or equipment visible: When Sweeney is coming at Books with the table in front of him, the squib detonation wires are visible on the floor. The same wires are seen when Books falls to the floor after being shot by the bartender, and when Gillom shoots the bartender the second time.

* Continuity: In the final shootout, Books fires his belly gun four times, before he drops it, and his holster gun three times. The two nearly simultaneous shots through Sweeney's table are so fast, they have to be one from each pistol. After Gillom takes the holster gun and fires it three times at the bartender, it should be empty. But as he prepares to throw the gun away, it is obvious there are still loaded rounds in at least two chambers.

* Revealing mistakes: When Books shoots Cobb in the final scene in the bar, Cobb's blood pack is clearly visible beneath his shirt.

* Continuity: Towards the end of the movie, before the final gunfight, Sweeny drives up and parks his automobile outside the Metropole. As he gets out of the auto, he raises the tiller. Moments later when Books arrives at the Metropole, the tiller on Sweeny's auto is in the lower position.

* Continuity: After he discharges Dobkins setting a foot on his buttock, and Dobkins stretchs out on the ground, Books throws away his hat which falls on his feet. When Dobkins picks it up still lying, it is on his right side almost about his hip.

* Factual errors: When Books arrives in Carson City, the newspaper he buys says "Monday Morning January 22, 1901" at the top. 22 January 1901 was actually a Tuesday.

* Continuity: Books' hair goes from being parted on his left to his right then back to his left after he tells Marshal Thibido he (Books) is going to die when they first meet while in Books' room.

* Anachronisms: In the opening scene labeled as being set in 1871, a pair of Colt Peacemaker revolvers with 4-3/4 inch barrels is shown. This model was developed for the US Army in 1873. Civilian sales started in 1875, and the 4-3/4 barrel length wasn't available until 1877.

* Crew or equipment visible: When Sweeney drives up and stops his automobile outside the Metropole, there is a visible "stop" device for the car placed on the ground at the left front wheel.

* Factual errors: Queen Victoria died on January 22nd so her death would not appear in the newspaper until the next day, January 23rd, at the very earliest, and certainly not as shown in the paper dated 22nd.

* Factual errors: When Bond and Books first meet, Books tells Bond that his name is William Hickock, former marshal of Abilene. Bond tells Gillom what Books said, and Gillom tells her that Wild Bill Hickock died before he (Gillom) was born. Wild Bill Hickock's name was James Butler Hickock, not William Hickock.

* Continuity: After Books and Gillom practice shooting at a tree, they go for a walk. Gillom pulls out a whiskey bottle. In the cut just before Books takes the bottle from Gillom's hand, the bottle position changes from Gillom's left hand to his right hand.

Memorable Quotes (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075213/quotes)

Filming Locations
Kings Row, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios - 4000 Warner Boulevard, Burbank, California, USA
Krebs-Peterson House - 500 Mountain Street, Carson City, Nevada, USA
Laramie Street, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios - 4000 Warner Boulevard, Burbank, California, USA
(studio)
Midwest Street, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios - 4000 Warner Boulevard, Burbank, California, USA
Stage 14, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios - 4000 Warner Boulevard, Burbank, California, USA
Stage 25, Warner Brothers Burbank Studios - 4000 Warner Boulevard, Burbank, California, USA
Washoe Lake State Park - 4855 Eastlake Boulevard, Carson City, Nevada, USA

Watch this Trailer

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Previous discussion:-
The Shootist (http://www.dukewayne.com/showthread.php?t=187)

ethanedwards
January 1st, 2006, 09:29 PM
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/wayne21.jpg

The Shootist is a 1976 Western film directed by Don Siegel and starring John Wayne in his final film role.
Based on the 1975 novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout
with a screenplay by Miles Hood Swarthout (the son of the author) and Scott Hale,
the film is about a dying gunfighter who spends his last days looking for a way to die
with the least pain and the most dignity
The film co-stars Lauren Bacall, Ron Howard, Harry Morgan, and James Stewart.
In 1977, The Shootist received an Academy Award nomination for Best Art Direction (Robert F. Boyle, Arthur Jeph Parker),
a BAFTA Film Award nomination for Best Actress (Lauren Bacall), and a Golden Globe Award
nomination for Best Actor (Ron Howard), as well as the National Board of Review Award
as one of the Top Ten Films of 1976.

Duke's final film is one that must rank, highly with The Searchers, Red River, etc.,
as one his greatest fims, and there's is a feeling amongst all his fans,
that he should have won another Oscar for his performance.
It was great story, set in motion by the brilliant montage, at the beginning.

Duke quoted,


"This is the kind of picture, you wait for.They don't come by often, so when they do, you grab fast"

In this case, he grabbed the right film, and in this case, the role, was the right role, for him.

User Review

One of the all-time great swan songs
8 March 2003 | by jimu63 (San Marcos, CA)

"The Shootist" was John Wayne's swan song as a film legend and, to put it mildly, he hit a home run. It is a terrific end to a legendary career.

After a brief prologue made up of film clips of Wayne in his career prime, we meet his cinematic alter ego, John Bernard Books, an aging gunfighter who rides into Carson City, Nevada in the early 1900's looking for Doc Hostetler (James Stewart), the old sawbones who once saved his life and apparently the only man he trusts. It seems the old guy has prostate cancer and only a few weeks to live, and as Hostetler tells him, it will not be a pleasant death. Books, with no where else to go, checks into Bond Rogers' (Lauren Bacall) boarding house to live out his final days in peace under the alias "William Hickok." When Bond's delinquent son Gillom (Ron Howard, in a nice change-of-pace performance and his last major film appearance before becoming a director) informs her of his true identity, she tries to throw him out but relents when she finds out his condition and agrees to help him die in peace.

Unfortunately, things don't go as planned as everyone from the town mortician (John Carradine) to an old girlfriend (Sheree North) to a newspaper editor (Richard Lenz) try to take advantage of his situation and turn a fast buck. And then there are several lowlifes (Richard Boone, Hugh O'Brien, Bill McKinney, etc.) who want to seal their reputations by taking him out. Since it's obvious that no one will leave him alone in his final days, and since he grows fond (to put it mildly) of both Bond and Gillom and wishes them no harm, Books decides to go out in style and on his own terms, and to take a few scumbags along with him.

"The Shootist" is one of those rare films that seems to have gotten better with age. It wasn't particularly successful with critics or audiences at the time, as they were apparently put off by its leisurely pace and relative lack of action. Typical of the reaction was a TV guide critic (who shall remain nameless), who once derided it and its stars as coming across as "relics of the old West." (Wasn't that the point?) However, it is now pretty much considered a classic, and rightfully so, especially when viewed next to some of the lesser films of Wayne's 1970's period ("Cahill," "Rooster Cogburn," "The Cowboys"). In fact, it is now hard to believe that Wayne was not nominated for an Oscar here, as Books is clearly one of the best performances of his career and definitely eclipses his extravagantly praised, Oscar-winning mugging in "True Grit." Indeed, "The Shootist" deserves to stand alongside Clint Eastwood's "The Outlaw Josey Wales" and Oscar-winning "Unforgiven" as the last three great Westerns in cinema history. Everything about it is immaculate--the sets, the costumes, the supporting cast (including Harry Morgan in a terrific cameo as an unsympathetic sheriff who tells Books, "What I put on your grave won't pass for roses."), the script, and the chemistry between Wayne and Bacall, teaming up for the first time since "Blood Alley." And everything is held together by old pro director Donald Siegel who, aside from the late Hal Ashby, may very well be the most underappreciated director in cinema history.

But "The Shootist" is John Wayne's film all the way. He is simply sensational, and BRAVE, since he apparently knew at the time his cancer was back and that this would probably be his last film. It's not every film legend who gets to end his/her career on a high note, but Wayne did just that. I just hope he knew it before his death barely three years later.

Baby Sister
January 2nd, 2006, 05:46 PM
I watched this movie again last and even though you know how it is going to end it still makes me cry every time I see it. The begining where they tie all his characters into the one J.B. Books character was just perfect. I remember when I saw it at the theater when it was first released being a fan you somehow knew that this was his last movie and that made it even sadder. I have never understood why Duke was not a least nominated for an Oscar for this performance, I guess it had something to with Hollywood politics, but I have always felt it was absolutely flawless and what a fitting end to his career.


Baby Sis

:cowboy: :cowboy: :cowboy:

arthurarnell
January 7th, 2006, 04:05 AM
Hi

Not being nominated for an oscar for the Shootist had nothing to do with his politics it was the studios mis management in releasing the film in the summer and putting all their effort into King Kong.


Regards


Arthur

InHarmsWay
January 9th, 2006, 11:57 PM
King kong, with jeff bridges and charles grodin was a flop was it now?. i particularly thought it was dreadful.

Just the same this movie is very touching and gets me everytime, must have been hard for the Duke to make this...knowing of course he would inevitably see his own fate end like this.

I really did not like little ronnie in this movie, but thought stewart,boone and bacall to be marvelous. I did like crothers as well as that haggler!..

-IHW

duke564ever
January 11th, 2006, 10:35 AM
Even though this was DUKE'S last film I rank it right up there with ROOSTER COGBURN . It really shows his outlook on life. The teenagers of today could learn alot from DUKE about how to live your life and how to respect yourself.

ethanedwards
January 24th, 2006, 04:21 AM
Memorable Quotes

John Bernard Books: Damn.
Bond Rogers: John Bernard, you swear too much.
John Bernard Books: The hell I do.
[Books has just had a confrontation with Mike Sweeney]

Mrs. Rogers: Do you know that man?
John Bernard Books: Not him personally; but I had some dealings with his brother, Albert.
Mrs. Rogers: What kind of dealings?
[Books looks at her]
Mrs. Rogers: Oh.

John Bernard Books: I won't be wronged. I won't be insulted. I won't be laid a-hand on. I don't do these things to other people, and I require the same from them.

Pulford confidante: Hey, Pulford. Did you hear John Bernard Books is stayin' out at Mrs. Rogers' boarding house? I heard Thibodo say he was dyin'!
Jack Pulford: Yes, so I heard. Shame; he was a man I could have taken.
Dearden: Bullshit.
Jack Pulford: My friend, you have two ways to leave this establishment; immediately or dead.

Carson City Marshal Walter Thibido: Books, I want you out of town. These are law-abiding people here and I don't want any trouble. I can deputize as many men as I need to see that you leave.
John Bernard Books: I'm not going anywhere, Marshal. I'm dying and I intend to die right here.
Carson City Marshal Walter Thibido: Really? You're really dyin'?
John Bernard Books: Ask Doc Hostetler.
Carson City Marshal Walter Thibido: Hot damn! You know, Books, that's the best news I've had all day. While I was walking over here I was thinking, what if Books decides to kill me? Who will take over as marshal? Will the town council pay my pension to my wife? Damn, that's good news.

Dr. E.W. Hostetler: Books, I've been a doctor a long time and every now and then I have to tell a man or a woman what I'm about to tell you. Books, you have a cancer.
John Bernard Books: Damn! Can you just cut it out?
Dr. E.W. Hostetler: No, I'd have to gut you like a fish.
John Bernard Books: Well, Doc; how long do I have?
Dr. E.W. Hostetler: Two maybe three months. You won't feel any different for a while, then the pain will start. A little at first, then toward the end, the pain will be unbearable.
John Bernard Books: Well, that's it then. Thanks, Doc.

Carson City Marshal Walter Thibido: Hey, Books; did you hear what happened at the Metropole last night? Faro dealer, Pulford, shot a man clean through the heart at eighty paces. Maybe you should go to the Metropole, let Pulford deal you a game of cards.

Dr. E.W. Hostetler: You know, Books; I'm not an especially brave man. But, if I were you and had lived my entire life the way you have, I don't think that the death I just described to you is not the one I would choose.

Gillom Rogers: [Books is giving Gillom gunfighting lessons] Mr. Books, my grouping of shots was tighter than yours. How is it you've killed so many men?
John Bernard Books: First thing is, that target wasn't shooting back at you. Second, most men at that last second will flinch; I won't.

INFORMATION FROM IMDb

DukePilgrim
January 25th, 2006, 09:36 AM
A classic movie which was a fitting wrap as his final movie.

Same he wasnt recognised by his peers.


Mike

ethanedwards
February 5th, 2006, 02:14 PM
Hi,
I have been researching all the threads, back to the start of the JWMB,
looking for previous discussion, relating to thIS movie.
I have found the following, comments, and have copied them here,
so that they are now under one forum:-

If you are interested, please click on the link:-

The Shootist, Waynes, Last and Greatest Movie (http://www.dukewayne.com/showthread.php?t=663)


The Shootist, The Book vs. The Movie (http://www.dukewayne.com/showthread.php?t=187)

The Shootist.DUKE AT HIS BEST (http://www.dukewayne.com/showthread.php?t=2075)

chester7777
February 5th, 2006, 10:37 PM
Originally posted by ethanedwards+Jan 1 2006, 07:29 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(ethanedwards @ Jan 1 2006, 07:29 PM)</div>
. . . and there's is a feeling amongst all his fans,
that he should have won another oscar for his performance.
24784[/b]
This fan agrees wholeheartedly with that!


Originally posted by Baby Sister@Jan 2 2006, 03:46 PM
I watched this movie again last and even though you know how it is going to end it still makes me cry every time I see it. The begining where they tie all his characters into the one J.B. Books character was just perfect.
24825
We hadn't paid such close attention to the beginning of the movie until, a couple of years ago, someone on this message board brought it to our attention. You are right - it was just right, and so much more meaningful when you have actually seen the movies from which the clips came.

<!--QuoteBegin-duke564ever@Jan 11 2006, 08:35 AM
Even though this was DUKE'S last film I rank it right up there with ROOSTER COGBURN . It really shows his outlook on life. The teenagers of today could learn alot from DUKE about how to live your life and how to respect yourself.

25215
AMEN to that, brother!

As you might guess from the comments above, this film ranks near the top of our list of JW movies. It is a classic, and truly a fitting final film for this great actor.

Deep Discount DVD (http://search.deepdiscountdvd.com/search?p=Q&ts=custom&w=shootist&search.x=0&search.y=0) offers this film individually as well as part of two different collections, and also some movie posters.

Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/103-2966141-4147854?search-alias=aps&keywords=shootist) has the newer release of The Shootist that is part of Paramount's John Wayne Collection (Deep Discount doesn't). Amazon also has the book on which the movie is based, as well as several collections which include this film.

Chester :newyear:

William T Brooks
March 13th, 2006, 01:27 PM
I had put this up on "Duke Stories" a year or two before, but I thought that it might belong here also. You can go to the Site Below for just about all you wanted to know about the Making of "The Shootist." :rolleyes:

THE SHOOTIST (http://www.wyntoontrip.com/SHOOTIST1.html)

Chilibill :cowboy:

Harry00
May 19th, 2006, 02:52 AM
I am sorry. I did not like this film. I'm not saying that it is not an excellent film, I'm just saying that I, personally, did not like it. I found it very depressing. Maybe I'm missing something, but I'm not adding this one to my collection. It is too sad.

ZACK613
May 30th, 2006, 12:45 PM
This is a powerful moving picture (no pun intented). It is made esp. powerful by the use of clips from old Duke pictures as J.B. Brooks' personal history. The supporting cast including Laurne Bacall, Ron Howard, Richard Boone, and Jimmy Stward of course, is just four-star as is Don Seagal's direction.

ethanedwards
November 16th, 2006, 08:18 PM
Duke's Movie Locations

The Shootist was filmed mostly in the following locations

WASHOE LAKE STATE PARK- NEVADA

974975976

Click on
Photo (http://parks.nv.gov/images/LWL3.jpg)

Washoe Lake State Park (http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://parks.nv.gov/images/LWL3.jpg&imgrefurl=http://parks.nv.gov/wl.htm&h=1200&w=1600&sz=850&hl=en&start=2&tbnid=ed5bQ8cnhfJjSM:&tbnh=113&tbnw=150&prev=/images%3Fq%3DWashoe%2BLake%2BState%2BPark%2B%26svn um%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-GB:official_s%26sa%3DN)

Information from
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Washoe Lake State Park is a Nevada state park in Washoe County, Nevada. Located between the cities of Carson City and Reno near US 395, it is in the Western Nevada Region of Nevada State Parks.

William T Brooks
November 17th, 2006, 08:07 AM
Here is a Little look at the Story Line of "The Shootist" and a Picture of One of the Colt Pistols Duke used in the Film. :rolleyes:

THE SHOOTIST STORY LINE (http://26barranch.com/SHOOTIST.html)

Chilibill :cowboy:

ethanedwards
February 18th, 2007, 10:26 AM
Some more photos,


143614371438

ethanedwards
February 18th, 2007, 10:28 AM
143914401441

ejgreen77
February 20th, 2007, 09:57 AM
A rare photo

1465
That photo looks like it's from True Grit. Isn't that Kim Darby Duke's talking to?

ethanedwards
February 20th, 2007, 11:34 AM
Yep, my mistake. Clicked the wrong thread!

chester7777
February 20th, 2007, 10:26 PM
Here's the theater poster for The Shootist -

Chester :newyear:

ethanedwards
February 21st, 2007, 03:58 AM
A lovely poster, one of the better ones

chester7777
February 21st, 2007, 10:28 AM
Keith,

Thank you. This is one that Les Adams, from Abilene, Texas shared with us.

Chester :newyear:

gt12pak
March 15th, 2007, 09:34 PM
I could be wrong, but I don't remember the word bs in this movie. But it won't hurt if I watch it again just to be sure. The Shootist was (is) one of my favorites.

Robbie
March 16th, 2007, 08:25 AM
John Bernards old flame calls him one.

The milk delivery man warns Duke at the start of the movie 'Yea I'm talking to you you dumb b*****d, I said move it or I'll deliver you something to remember me by.

John Bernard told said to the sheriff, 'Your the longest winded b*****d I ever listened to.

:agent:

gt12pak
March 16th, 2007, 02:47 PM
Absolutely right and what a filthy mouth Ron Howard had.

DukePilgrim
April 5th, 2007, 06:28 AM
I read in Emmanuel Levy's book on John Wayne that Paul Newman and George C Scott were both offered the role of JB Book's before John Wayne.

Paul Newman passed on the role and George C Scott wanted too many changes made to the script.

The winning choice of Duke was also added to the fact that they could use footage from his old movies in the credits to show the life of J B Books.


Mike

Lt. Brannigan
April 22nd, 2007, 11:03 PM
I have had this book for a year now but I have yet to read it, maybe cause it's very difficult for me to watch this movie. I watched my Granddad go through pretty much the same thing with his cancer and I have a hard time watching this without thinking about him. But I have to say that this film was the best way for him to end his career, regardless of the fact that he never viewed this as his swan song. But what a beautiful swan song it was, and the perfect epitaph to a legendary career.

stacy
May 22nd, 2007, 06:36 PM
Hi,
I love this movie, even if it makes me cry everytime I watch it. I think that is because you know that in real life that he is fighting cancer. But there again, that is the person he was, and that is why he is loved so much!
stacy

Danny
May 27th, 2007, 11:48 AM
I agree it is an amazing movie, but is very hard to watch without tearing up!

H.sanada
July 15th, 2007, 02:49 AM
Hi everyone
This movie is one of my fayorites.
and for a lomg time, I have one question.
I wonder what brand of whisky(may be bourbon?) which on the bar counter
in this movie's scene?
this whisky's label mark looks like clover.
sanda

chester7777
July 17th, 2007, 04:03 AM
sanda,

I will have to pull out my copy of The Shootist and watch it to see if we can answer your question, but in the meantime, I would like to welcome you to the John Wayne Message Board!

As far as I know, you are our first and only member from Japan. You've expanded our scope to another continent!

We hope you will take a moment and introduce yourself to us in the Newbie Forum.

Again, WELCOME!

Chester :newyear: and the Mrs. :angel1:

ethanedwards
July 17th, 2007, 10:50 AM
sanda,

I will have to pull out my copy of The Shootist and watch it to see if we can answer your question, but in the meantime, I would like to welcome you to the John Wayne Message Board!

As far as I know, you are our first and only member from Japan. You've expanded our scope to another continent!

We hope you will take a moment and introduce yourself to us in the Newbie Forum.

Again, WELCOME!

Chester :newyear: and the Mrs. :angel1:

I echo the above, but to add,
I see the Whiskey bottle, with sort of a yellowish label,
but can't read it.

Perhaps our whiskey drinking friends in the States,
will sober up enough, to tell us!!!

H.sanada
July 18th, 2007, 07:10 AM
chester777
Thank you for your invitation to newbie forum.
and I hope american whisky friend will teach me that whisky brand name.

I effort to introduce myself in the newbie forum, but my ability of english speaking
or writing is so poor. please forgive me my odd expression,miss spelling.
sanda

Jay J. Foraker
August 14th, 2007, 02:48 PM
Just watched this the other night. I was amazed at the amount of exceptional actors involved. A high quality production all the way around. And Duke's acting was terrific. This was one of the few times that Ron Howard appeared before the cameras (after "The Andy Griffith Show") before going on to directing, and his acting abilities were paramount too. Loved Harry Morgan as he portrayed his character's exuberance on hearing of Books' cancer.
Cheers - Jay:beer:

William T Brooks
August 17th, 2007, 04:35 PM
Jay I agree with you Completly, and think this was one of Duke's Best Films. And how could you beat The Cast ! Most of the Main Cast had ask to be in the Film with Duke, because I think they all knew this would be one of His Last Film, and they were Right !!!
:cry2:
Bill:cowboy:

DukePilgrim
August 18th, 2007, 05:49 PM
The Shootist is a brilliant movie and a wonderful Epitaph to a long and wonderful career.

If Paramount had spent more time marketing it rather than King Kong Duke would have got a second Oscar.

Mike

Jay J. Foraker
August 18th, 2007, 09:48 PM
Definitely Duke gave an Oscar winning performance in this!
Cheers - Jay:beer:

William T Brooks
August 20th, 2007, 09:21 AM
Jay, You are Right, This should have been Duke's Second Oscar, But Most of Hollywood Did Not Like Duke !!!
:evilgrin:

Bill
:cowboy:

William T Brooks
August 20th, 2007, 09:36 AM
Sanada,
Most of the Bottles in the Films are made of what was Called "Candy Glass" and would Break But Would Not Cut You. It was Made of the same thing as the Windows Glass that You See Them Breaking in the Films !
The Labels on the Bottles were "Called No Name Labels" and made up for the Films so that They would not Get in Trouble With the Companys that Make The Real Stuff !!!

Chilibill
:cowboy:

H.sanada
September 30th, 2007, 04:11 AM
Thank you Brooks
No name Labels,regrettably i understand.

and one more question.
His last day,J.B.Books said a greeting to little lady in the streetcar.
by japanese subtitle,it was "I hope you will meet a good young man "
but a restriction of transrate that three word by a second we can read,
subtitles are not seldom uncorrect.

I heard that line is "I sure hope you have right to welcome a star"
want what Books said ?
Best regards,

sanada

William T Brooks
September 30th, 2007, 08:57 AM
H. sanada
J.B. Books tells The Young Lady "I Sure Hope The Right Fellow Comes Along."
:teeth_smile:
Duke said He added that to the Script , so that J.B. Books would look like a Real Gentleman Before He went into the Saloon For the Big Gunfight !!!
:dead:
Chilibill
:cowboy:

H.sanada
October 1st, 2007, 06:49 AM
Thanks again Brooks
Because of my poor ability for english hearing,It made a mistake dangerously.
" I sure hope the right fellow comes along " is a good dialogue and just like Duke
to say so!

About this dialogue,there's an interesting story.
Several years ago, Mr.Ohbayashi(japanese movie director)visited Duke's daughter
and he heard from her that this dialogue was often said by Duke in real life.

Is it true?
and I want to know the name of Duke's daughter who told so .
Anybody know?
Best regards,

H.sanada

ColeThornton
October 1st, 2007, 08:03 AM
Yes it does sound like the kind of thing Duke would say.

William T Brooks
October 1st, 2007, 08:30 AM
H. sanada
I think that was Duke's Young Daughter "Aissa," and Yes when Duke did meet a Young Lady that Did Not have a Wedding Ring on Her Finger, being the Gentlman that He Was would say "I Sure Hope the Right Fellow Comes along."
:regular_smile:
Bill
:cowboy:

H.sanada
October 2nd, 2007, 06:52 AM
Yes We are very happy Duke's last movie is The Shootist, the great western movie
filled with his gentlemanship.
H.sanada

chester7777
October 2nd, 2007, 09:12 AM
Yes We are very happy Duke's last movie is The Shootist, the great western movie filled with his gentlemanship.
Great observation!

We appreciate the film as a fitting end to a long and illustrious cinematic career. The character, and the man who played him, were very human in their response to great pain, but both gracious gentlemen as well.

Chester :newyear: and the Mrs. :angel1:

Lt. Brannigan
October 2nd, 2007, 03:49 PM
Great observation!

We appreciate the film as a fitting end to a long and illustrious cinematic career. The character, and the man who played him, were very human in their response to great pain, but both gracious gentlemen as well.

Amen, I could not have put it better.

Elly
October 18th, 2007, 06:18 PM
Everything said here is quite right. A fitting and moving end to a magnificent career.

I ALWAYS cry buckets when I watch this film. Bet all you guys shed a tear too if your not too macho to admit it.

The casting was superb. Lauren Bacall was perfect. My apologies to MOH but for me she would not have been right as I recall too much on screen history between her and JW.

William T Brooks
October 18th, 2007, 09:02 PM
Elly,
I Don't Cry Buckets Of Tears, but I do admit that when I watch the Film "The Shootist" and that is quite often, I keep a Box of Tissue Close By for that Tear or Two, as this was a Great Duke Film, with a Great Cast all the way, and just the way that I Remember Him !
:cry2:
Bill
:cowboy:

Lt. Brannigan
October 19th, 2007, 01:53 PM
This movie always makes me tear up, as I witnessed my Granddad suffer pretty much the same way.

Elly
October 19th, 2007, 03:57 PM
Elly,

I Don't Cry Buckets Of Tears, but I do admit that when I watch the Film "The Shootist" and that is quite often, I keep a Box of Tissue Close By for that Tear or Two, as this was a Great Duke Film, with a Great Cast all the way, and just the way that I Remember Him !
:cry2:
Bill

:cowboy:


Bill you are very fortunate to have known JW personally. And we are very fortunate thast you tell us these stories and give us this "inside" information. I know i am not alone in telling you how very much I enjoy and appreciate it. Thank you

Lt. Brannigan
December 10th, 2007, 10:19 AM
Watching this film after many of his other films, makes it even more poignant for there are many moments in this film that make this film the fitting farewell that it is. The last 20 minutes of the film hold the most significance, in these 20 minutes I feel that Duke was in effect saying goodbye to his fans... I know that there are a lot of arguments over this, but it seems to me that he knew he was dying and that this was his last chance for a cinematic finale worthy of his stature. Heck, if one views his entire body of work from the 70's it's almost like a long goodbye.... now I know that's a stretch, but in these 10 films he inserts more of his wisdom then previously decades.

This decade had his most heartfelt films, filled with damn good advice to live by and about what being a man is. But getting back to the film, the moments between Duke and Bacall are especially emotional and heart tugging. If you don't get misty eyed, then you are obviously stone hearted. Or perhaps you have no idea just who the hell John Wayne is. No other actor has, at least in my knowledge, ever had a screen epitaph worthy of capping their career

Now onto the analysis of the film

Acting
The Acting was wonderful; Duke gives easily the best performance of his career. The entire cast deserved awards with one exception. The best scenes, as I previously stated, are those between Bacall and Duke, you feel almost as if Bacall was saying goodbye to Duke himself instead of John Bernard Books.

Story
This viewing is the first time I have ever paid attention to the nuances of the film and let me tell you.... this film is highly rewarding and worth owning if you are even a casual fan of the Duke's.

And the rest
The score was fitting, especially when he walked into the bar for the final showdown. The cinematography was in short awesome and rivals that of the work done by Clothier. And the editing was obviously done by seasoned pros. Now the only reason I mention the editing is because prior to this film I watched Rooster Cogburn which was very badly edited, and stuck me as a film from first timers.

QuirtEvans
January 13th, 2008, 01:35 PM
What was the one exception?

brick
January 19th, 2008, 04:37 AM
I may have asked this before but I can't remeber. The meds I'm taking now are pretty strong so I forget easy so please forgive me if I have. I had heard That when they were trying to cast the shootist they offered it to many before finally giving it to Wayne. I heard Newman, and Hackman and Boone along with several others. Duke was getting pretty mad because he wanted this role so bad. My thoughts are I wonder if the others turned it down because they all knew it was perfect for the Duke since he had cancer and out of respect, I would like to also know why they didn't offer it to duke in the first place I mean it fit his life to a tee. I heard this on tcm or HDnet or hell maybe I dreamed it. Has anyone heard this story.

Robbie
January 19th, 2008, 05:49 AM
Hi Brick

I don't believe anybody turned it down because they felt it was more appropriate for Duke e.g. Gregory Peck turned the role down due to the fact that he played a similar role in "The Gunfighter,".

At the time Duke Dukes health was deteriorating and many felt he would not be able to complete this film therefore they asked other actors before him.

:agent:

arthurarnell
January 20th, 2008, 02:28 AM
Hi

I'm just about to go out to work so I haven't got the full time to research this topic but the role was offered to three or four other actors before John wayne took it.
The book was quite earthy and controversial and before it came to the screen had to amended quite severely.
If you read Don Segals' book the first chapter deals with the making of The Shootist.

Regards

Arthur

brick
January 20th, 2008, 04:32 AM
Thanks I'll try to find the book. The shootist is my favorite Duke movie although it's sad I believe it's wayne's finest acting. I used to not be able to watch the cowboys or shootist because he was killed in both. I got by that and the shootist became my favorite.

Hondo Duke Lane
January 20th, 2008, 08:25 AM
George C. Scott was originally offered the role of Books, and accepted it on the condition that not one word of the script be changed. However, the role was given to John Wayne after he expressed interest. The producers claim they had wanted him all along, but did not believe he would be interested in the film.

This is what I found in the imbd thread about The Shootist. There might be more information about that, but I haven't found anything yet. I'll check later today on that information.

Cheers :cool: Hondo

Stumpy
January 20th, 2008, 08:44 AM
"The producers claim they had wanted him all along, but did not believe he would be interested in the film."

This is a very strange statement since I'm sure most of us on this board feel the movie was written specifically for our main man. I know I myself feel that way.

William T Brooks
January 21st, 2008, 09:03 AM
Here is a little Story about the Story line in Duke's Great Film
"The Shootist"
:teeth_smile:
http://www.ranch26bar.com/THESHOOTIST.html

Chilibill
:cowboy:

brick
January 21st, 2008, 10:15 AM
If the producers wanted him all along why didn't they jsut offer it to him and let him decide. The report I heard was wayne was getting angry because he wanted the role and they kept offering it to others. I wish there was clear cut evidence either way.

William T Brooks
January 21st, 2008, 12:39 PM
Here is a little more Infro. on Duke and Him wanting to do The Shootist.

http://www.ranch26bar.com/THESHOOTIST1.html

Chilibill
:cowboy:

BILL OF PA
January 21st, 2008, 03:49 PM
this role was offered to george c scott who acceped aslong as nothing in the book changed. when word got out that duke was able to play the part well the rest is history.the movie was changed to fit him.

brick
January 25th, 2008, 06:38 PM
Thanks Chilli Bill. That answers alot.

Hondo Duke Lane
January 26th, 2008, 08:00 AM
Has George C Scott ever done a western?

Cheers :cool:

gt12pak
January 26th, 2008, 09:09 PM
My question about the Shootist is what was he gonna do after he survived the gunfight. I know the bartender shot him, but if he hadn't, what was J. B. Books gonna do after that? I mean he still had cancer, was he gonna take his own life?

Hondo Duke Lane
January 26th, 2008, 10:24 PM
My question about the Shootist is what was he gonna do after he survived the gunfight. I know the bartender shot him, but if he hadn't, what was J. B. Books gonna do after that? I mean he still had cancer, was he gonna take his own life?

The book ended with Gilliam shooting Books in the back, and of course the movie had the bartender shooting Books in the back.

So if he had lived, we can only speculate an alternate ending, so I'd have to say based on the movie, that Books would have walked away, and looked for others to try to gun him down. I think that Gilliam's mom and Books would have nurtured their relationship, and became closer. Then others would try, but Books condition would worsen and the cancer is unbearable, until the sheriff comes in and guns down Books in cold blood, but the newspaper writer would make the sheriff the hero. A great scandal to say the least.

I like the movie's ending better by the way, gt.

Cheers :cool: Hondo

gt12pak
January 26th, 2008, 11:08 PM
Hi Hondo

At some point I would like to read that book, I've heard a lot about it and yes, I knew that Gillem was the one who shot Books in the back. Why would he do this? Unless he was trying to become the next shootist.

But as far as the sherrif goes, I suppose he would have to have done something. Maybe he could have shot Books before Books shot him. But for arguments sake, let's say Books got away scott-free, and I agree that the cancer would have gotten to him sooner or later, do you think he would have eventually taken his own life?

Me personally, I'm kinda like you in that I think he would have just kept on gunfighting until somebody sooner or later was just a bit faster than him.

Hondo Duke Lane
January 26th, 2008, 11:19 PM
I haven't read the book either, so I don't know what Gilliam was thinking or if he was going to be the next shootist. My reference point was the movie which I am more familiar with.

I may have not interpreted this to you correctly, but the sheriff shoots Books in the back like a coward, either while he is sleeping, eating his meal, or taking his medicine. I consider the sheriff crooked.

I am not sure if Gilliam is the faster gunfighter or not. I didn't think he was in the movie version. I'll just have to read the book myself, or maybe someone can enlighten us on this question who has read the book.

Cheers :cool: Hondo

dukefan1
January 26th, 2008, 11:47 PM
While the book was a very good read, it does not end on a high note. Gilliam starts out being in awe of Books in the beginning of the book, but after he finds out that Books is dying, and sees how weak he has become, he actually starts treating him with disdain. And Giliam does shoot Books in the end, but it is Books who asks him to do it, after being shot in the back by the bartender. I won't go into any more detail to save those who intend to read the book.

I did read elsewhere that John Wayne wanted the part but wanted the ending to be different. He wanted Gillaim to learn that Books life isn't the way Gilliam should aspire to be. He wanted him to be dispelled of the adoration he held for the life with the gun and go in a different direction. so they rewrote it to end that way. I liked the way the movie ending was way more than the book.

Another thing about the book. It was very graphic in it's description of J.B.'s cancer and what it was doing to him. It also goes into detail about each bullit as it enters it's intended victim and the damage it did. Kinda gory. :vomit:

Mark

Jay J. Foraker
January 27th, 2008, 11:46 AM
Has George C Scott ever done a western?
Cheers :cool:
He did "The Hanging Tree" with Gary Cooper.
Cheers - Jay:beer:

gt12pak
February 28th, 2008, 06:30 PM
One of my favorite soundtracks......enjoy.

3NEfcj5ssWw

Robbie
February 28th, 2008, 06:46 PM
One of my favorite soundtracks......enjoy.

3NEfcj5ssWw

I find it very haunting but very very impressive, its a shame the video could not provide some film footage to go with this great tune.

:agent:

Johnc
March 14th, 2008, 01:42 AM
Although I really enjoy watching The Shootist I also find it quite sad knowing its Duke's last movie

That said, I feel its a fitting tribute to JW

dukefan1
April 6th, 2008, 10:32 AM
Here is an example of the book. Enjoy!

Mark

http://www.dukewayne.com/imagehosting/2147f8ec291aade.jpg

gt12pak
April 6th, 2008, 05:51 PM
I tried to find this one at my local Barnes and Noble the other day, but they don't seem to have it. I guess I'll to get mine off ebay.:glare:

kilo 6
May 30th, 2008, 02:45 PM
Not an easy one to watch but a classy finish to a great career

captain dan
June 6th, 2008, 08:53 PM
very good movie.How did we all feel when Gillom walks out of the tavern and walks by his mother bond? The young man grew up at this point and his life was forever changed. The way J.B Book dies with such courage was indicitive of the way the Duke handled his own bout with cancer leading to his death. There willnever be a man like him again.

Jacob-R387
June 6th, 2008, 09:36 PM
This was my first John Wayne film i ever saw, one of his finest in my opinion.

Duke's Duchess
July 20th, 2008, 12:54 PM
i agree this movie was really sad for me to watch, knowing that it was Dukes last. but the way he carried himself through the whole thing was jus amazing. this movie is one of my favorites. there will never be anyone like him again

badger
September 26th, 2008, 01:46 PM
i loved this film. i loved the black and white beginning and the quiet dignity and courage he showed throughout, particularly on his last day when he got dressed to go and do what he had to do

Tbone
March 5th, 2009, 08:25 AM
I have to say something that saddens me to say.

Of all the John Wayne films out there, this one is not for children. The cursing is over the top. I can not recall another John Wayne film in which there is so much swearing.

I enjoyed the intro with the clips from Dukes old films, but as we were watching this film last night, I had to turn it off. It was scandalizing my children.

I don't understand why Duke allowed the script to be this coarse.

It could have accomplished everything it set out to be without the language.

Does anyone else have the same reaction to this film?

dukefan1
March 5th, 2009, 09:35 AM
I'll have to admit, Tbone, that I was puzzled by this post. I don't remember any vulgar language in The Shootist. Maybe I'm desensitized by the cussing in so many movies of today that I don't notice it in older films. I'll have to watch The Shootist again to see what you mean.

I know that he addressed the use of profanity in his Playboy interview when asked:


Playboy: Audiences may like your kind of violence on the screen, but they'd never heard profanity in a John Wayne movie until "True Grit". Why did you finally decide to use such earthly language in a film?

Wayne: In my other pictures, we've had an explosion or something go off when a bad word was said. This time we didn't. It's profanity, all right, but I doubt if there's anybody in the United States who hasn't heard the expression son of a bitch or bastard. We felt it was acceptable in this instance, At the emotional high point in that particular picture, I felt it was ok to use it. It would have been pretty hard to say, "you illegitimate sons of so-and-so! "
So, I guess he may have felt that it was appropriate for the scenes in The Shootist. I've never read anywhere about him having an issue with it. He just disagreed on how the movie should end and they rewrote it to end in a way that pleased Duke.


Mark

Tbone
March 5th, 2009, 11:56 AM
Mark,

I had forgotten myself until we turned it on. I haven't seen the Shootest in probably 5 years. Between him, Ron Howard and Harry Morgan, they say about everything except the "F" bomb. Lot's of taking Our Lord's Name in vain there. That's when I finally had to say "enough".

Lt. Brannigan
March 5th, 2009, 12:42 PM
As I recall Harry Morgan says Gosh Darn twice in the movie. But I don't recall any other profanities.

tinker
July 23rd, 2009, 03:33 AM
I watched this movie again. I admit I have to be in a certain mood to watch it because it really does haunt you.

Its a beautiful movie and I guess no actor ever had a better send off role. I know John Wayne always acted with his eyes but in this one it just hurts looking at the pain. A couple of things.

Has anyone else noted that for a man who couldn't sing, John Wayne sang in an awful lot of his movies. I can think of the Quiet Man, McLintock, 3 Godfathers. Hatari. John Wayne singing Gilbert and Sullivan in the Shootist must have been a first.

I am not to sure if this was intended or not but notice when John Wayne gets off Dollar in front of the doctor's he steps onto a mounting block, maybe it was meant to indicate Books was in pain or maybe Wayne really needed it.

When he rides up to the boarding house, and goes to get off, the last time he ever will get off horse in the movies, there is a mounting block just in front of the house and presumably it is there for him to use to dismount. However the Duke pulls up just in front and gets off without using the mounting block.

I watched the documentary on the DVD and it seemed to me that the producers were a bit annoyed with Wayne for stopping them using the ending in the book because the ending used made the story about the end of an era not the start of a new one and therefore 'Hollywood'. I also chose to see the taking out the three men is Books symbolically ending his era. Carson City is changing and no longer a town where people should kill each other in saloons and streets. He takes out the remnants of his own era before he goes. Anyway that is my interpretation.

All I can say is that I am glad the Duke stuck to his guns about the ending. I never can understand why film makers have to make non-Hollywood endings which seems to me to be an ego trip at the expense of their audience. It shows a total disrespect for the audience which the Duke didn't do. I don't think audiences mind sad endings but they resent futile one which non Hollywood endings usually are. And the book one would have destroyed all the dignity of the character.

One of the producers claims the 'Hollywood" ending weakened the film but I personally think the book ending would have destroyed it. There is something noble about J.B Books dignity and shooting a man in the back and destroying Gillam's life as he died would have made a mockery of when he tells Mrs Rogers he is maybe a better man than she thinks which the way the character is played is easy to believe.

Anyway I think this is a beautiful film and I am glad that it was John Wayne who made it because I suspect with any of the other actors who were considered, it would have been about the violent ending of the last of the Wild Bunch and not the ending of John T. Chance.

dee

stagecoach50
July 23rd, 2009, 06:45 AM
THE SHOOTIST is a great film, in fact even the critics liked it when it came out, very rare for Duke in his last films. There was even talk of Duke getting the nod for a second Oscar. I think he new his health was becoming an issue, I am sure he did not have cancer at the time, but he knew inside he was not the same ol' JW.:teeth_smile:

William T Brooks
July 23rd, 2009, 08:37 AM
Duke was Very Sick when He was making this Film and had already lost one Lung To as He Said "The Big C" and was having a Very Hard Time Breathing !
:yeaahh:
I think that one of the Great Things was that All The Other Main People in the Film, ask To Be In The Film, and some said they would do The Film with No Pay !!!
Chilibill
:cowboy:


http://www.ranch26bar.com/THESHOOTIST.html

brick
July 23rd, 2009, 10:36 AM
Great story Bill, The shootist is my favorite movie, I thought Dukes acting was second to none in this movie. I also beleive in real liofe if he could have he would have wanted to go out this way instead of the slowness of cancer.

brick
July 23rd, 2009, 10:41 AM
I also must say it took me many years before i could watch this film because i couln't stand the thought of duke being killed. thats the kind of impact the duke had on me.

Gorch
November 14th, 2009, 08:53 AM
One of the all time greatest films.
Two very small character touches really elevate Duke's character for me.
The first is when he tells Doc that the ornate pillow he stole from a whorehouse in Creed. The smile on Duke's face is priceless and reminds me of his younger self.
The second moment is the look of satisfaction on his face when Gillem flings the gun away in the bar. It's a look that says he accomplished steering a boy on the right path. No words could have done better.



We deal in lead, friend.

BILL OF PA
November 22nd, 2009, 09:18 PM
This one of my all time great wayne films. the acting by all is second to none. last year i was given a personal tour of warner brothers back lot were most of this film was made. the scene when he first rode into town,doc hostetlers house the street where he first meets richard boone and the acme saloon which was a police station at the time i was there.

dukefan1
November 23rd, 2009, 12:42 AM
That must have been really cool, Bill. Did you take any pictures? Has it changed much? It has been 30 years or so. I envy you all the same.

Mark

BILL OF PA
November 23rd, 2009, 07:16 PM
That must have been really cool, Bill. Did you take any pictures? Has it changed much? It has been 30 years or so. I envy you all the same.

Mark
Yes I did take pictures but not with a digital.I,am still a bit of a dinosaur.I was amazed at how much stood right out at you,like Dr.Hoetetlers house the gazebo in the center of town. The tour was given to myself and Joe Zuke by a fine gentelmen and Duke collector by the name of Foster Dennis. Also saw the outside set for the show ER. This was in sept. of last year in the 80s and fake snow everywhere to make it look like the dead of winter in Chicago. Buy the way the el tracks they drove under was about 40 feet long.

chester7777
November 27th, 2009, 10:58 AM
Here is one of the better known quotes from this film, and also a favorite of many members (several have used it in their signatures) - just click on the quote below (which is a link) to hear Duke's voice.

"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted..." (http://www.cowboyway.com/Clips/IWontBeWronged.wav)

Tbone
July 6th, 2010, 09:57 AM
Was watching the Shootist this weekend and I was wondering about the scene where Duke gives Ron the shooting lesson. Does anyone know if JW actually did his own shooting when that tight group hits the left fork of the tree?

etphoto
July 11th, 2010, 03:11 PM
Tbone,

I'd guess that was special effects and not real shooting.

On a different note, I was watching Clint Eastwood's Gran Torino the other day. Anyone notice toward the end of the movie as Eastwood was preparing to visit the street gang's house? The sets he was taking, preparing for the visit? Look awful familiar.

ET

ethanedwards
July 11th, 2010, 06:56 PM
Tbone,

I'd guess that was special effects and not real shooting.

On a different note, I was watching Clint Eastwood's Gran Torino the other day. Anyone notice toward the end of the movie as Eastwood was preparing to visit the street gang's house? The sets he was taking, preparing for the visit? Look awful familiar.

ET



Good point ET, but it seems all of Clint's location work
was centered around Michigan,
whereas The Shootist was filmed in Nevada
and the studios in California

etphoto
July 11th, 2010, 09:07 PM
Good point ET, but it seems all of Clint's location work
was centered around Michigan,
whereas The Shootist was filmed in Nevada
and the studios in California

Whoops. I need to do more proof reading. Not "sets" he was taking. But STEPS he was taking, as he was preparing to die. I told me wife at the time, this is just like the Shootist, Eastwood's preparation and the Duke's (in the Shootist) were very similar.

ET

lasbugas
March 23rd, 2011, 03:01 PM
http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144f10.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5029&u=11975903)

http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144_10.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5030&u=11975903)

http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144_11.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5031&u=11975903)

http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144_12.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5032&u=11975903)

http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144_13.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5046&u=11975903)

http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144_14.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5047&u=11975903)

http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144_15.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5048&u=11975903)

http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/20144_16.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=5049&u=11975903)

lasbugas
December 17th, 2011, 01:47 AM
http://i27.servimg.com/u/f27/11/97/59/03/duke_c81.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=4835&u=11975903)

http://i37.servimg.com/u/f37/11/97/59/03/duke_395.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=4719&u=11975903)

http://i37.servimg.com/u/f37/11/97/59/03/duke_262.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=4550&u=11975903)

chester7777
December 18th, 2011, 01:03 AM
I suspect this Pat Berman, the review writer of the Shootist, for the Columbia Record, is more than likely just another liberal newspaper writer.
Fortunately, in this day and age, folks are waking up, and the newspaper owners wonder where all the people that buy newspapers went.

Chester (xmastree):newyear: (xmastree)

Peridot
December 24th, 2011, 12:50 PM
Ouch, Chester. That stings. As a card-carrying member of the Liberal party I'm proud to be a fan of John Wayne. I make no secret of it and I'm certainly not ashamed of it. There's plenty of room in the world for all of us to respect one another.

While I'd never read that particular review before I knew that there were many undeserved slings and arrows aimed at The Shootist when it premiered. At this point one must wonder whether the Western genre was being punished for its demise rather than the film itself at that moment. Family Westerns were dead and buried by 1976. Unless a Western showed blood and brains squirting from bullet wounds, few would attend the film.

In my humble opinion, few critics understood The Shootist when it premiered. Pat Berman missed it by a mile. She evidently confused it with a sequel to everything else Mr Wayne made.

John Wayne himself had intended to go on filming more movies. From what I have read, Mr Wayne had great difficulty in making that film. I believe it was Maureen O'Hara (please, do correct me if I'm wrong) who wrote Lauren Bacall said that Mr Wayne was coughing up blood during filming and was on O2 at all times when he wasn't on camera. Still, it was never meant to be his swan song.

My uncle lost a lung to lung cancer and he lived a very long 20 years on a single lung, suffering all that time. It was not pleasant nor was it a happy life for him. He had to retire immediately and he never worked on anything again. I can only imagine how it was for Mr Wayne. I have the greatest respect for him that he not only completed the film after being hospitalised but that he intended to go on making more films. John Wayne was truly an inspiration to us all.

Now I've battled cancer myself I understand what a real hero John Wayne truly was to us all. I wouldn't usually write about my personal life when I've been a member such a short time on a board, but I feel this is relevant.

Name-calling is never helpful, Chester. During the time this film premiered, remember that violence in America was increasing and people were wondering if it was connected to violence on television and in films. The Vietnam War was fresh in memory. My brother, a Marine Ranger, was still MIA.

I came here to talk about The Shootist with friends. If Liberals aren't welcome here then never mind.

lasbugas
December 25th, 2011, 04:31 AM
http://i67.servimg.com/u/f67/11/97/59/03/a_duke41.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=6850&u=11975903)

http://i67.servimg.com/u/f67/11/97/59/03/wayne616.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=2863&amp;u=11975903)

lasbugas
December 26th, 2011, 11:47 PM
http://i77.servimg.com/u/f77/11/97/59/03/a_duke42.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=7272&u=11975903)

lasbugas
March 28th, 2012, 02:05 PM
http://i47.servimg.com/u/f47/11/97/59/03/duke_a50.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=10129&u=11975903)

Peridot
April 21st, 2012, 12:16 PM
Lasbugas, thanks for sharing these wonderful images. They're beautiful.

ethanedwards
July 5th, 2012, 12:26 PM
As Jimmy Stewart westerns are being discussed,
perhaps a good time to bump this to the top

The Irish Duke
September 18th, 2012, 11:08 PM
I watched the first 20 minutes of the shootist then turned it off, my two favorite actors are in it, and I love happy days but I just found it too raw.

Hawkswill
September 20th, 2012, 01:21 PM
I watched the first 20 minutes of the shootist then turned it off, my two favorite actors are in it, and I love happy days but I just found it too raw.

Hi G. You didn't give it a chance. The guy who went with us the first time I saw it in the theater almost ruined the whole movie for us.....all very staunch Duke fans. But, as it went along, he got more and more quiet. Duke showed a side that was completely outside his norm in some places.......others, he was still Duke. Have to take that back. Throughout, he was Duke....just an older one who was dying. He acted as if I would have expected him to in that situation. His facial expressions were incredible. There was chaos and there was laughter.

His accepting the fact that he was dying and his interactions with Jimmy Stewart were gut wrenching for a Duke fan......also for a Stewart fan as he played his part well in that his explanations to JB Books were extrememly difficult for him.....he LIKED Books. But, by the time Books left the Doc's office the first go around, and the telling of where he got the pillow was pretty much the end of Book's feeling sorry for himself. Oh, he still had the scene to go through with the Doc on just HOW he was going to die, but he had already accepted it as a fact.

The rest of the movie was the building of relationships, Books' trying to get as much living in as possible, and the planning of his death, which thanks to the Doc's few sentences, would not be one of a slow living hell kind of dying.

This is one of Duke's movies that you just cannot miss G. It was Duke's last gift to us.....think of it that way. If he didn't show he could truly act in The Shootist, he NEVER did!

This last time, I have watched it about times 20. Today was the first instance there were absolutely no tears....not one. I believe it took me that many times to truly understand and appreciate this movie as Duke meant for us to......I am a bit slow, you know.

So, G., do yourself a favor, get ready emotionally, and then sit down and watch it...all the way through. This is life as real as it gets. No "window dressing" in this one. And IF Duke had really been JB Books as he was portrayed, the end was right on the money! Remember, he still WON in the end........it was the third eye that got him.....just as he had wanted it to.

Keith

The Irish Duke
September 21st, 2012, 09:41 PM
I take your point but i might be one for me abit further down the line. I'm not ashamed to say I found it all too much emotional and depressing, especially the way the duke played it and knowing how he ended up. I will give it another chance eventually though, just might leave it awhile yet.

Hawkswill
September 22nd, 2012, 01:07 AM
I take your point but i might be one for me abit further down the line. I'm not ashamed to say I found it all too much emotional and depressing, especially the way the duke played it and knowing how he ended up. I will give it another chance eventually though, just might leave it awhile yet.

Well, Gareth, you are quite young. I am trying to remember back....how I felt about things like that at your age. I believe I might have felt as you do unless someone older had explained it to me. I have tried to. I really think you would get a new appreciation of Duke early on that most of us were never able to do because of our age and the fact that we sort of "grew up" with him. I still think you should see it as soon as you can. You will be able to see Duke, the Man, and then will be able to enjoy all the movies of his that you haven't seen yet. You will see him at what I think is his very best acting. But, maybe you want to save the "dessert" for the end of the "meal". For that is what the Shootist is.....the "dessert"! Duke gives us HIMSELF in this movie. He was not diagnosed with cancer again as of yet. But, he was coughing up blood and using oxygen all the time. He knew. Although he made other plans, he knew. I just wish Duke could have gone out as JB Books did....sure would been a lot easier for him.
Did you see the Jimmy Stewart movie yet.

And don't ever be ashamed........it is a sign of weakness, LOL........just joking, it is a JW quote that says "Don't ever apologize, it is a sign of weakness"! Think it was in Yellow Ribbon? One of the trilogies.

Just remember.......lots of folks say Duke couldn't act. If someone sees The Shootist and says that, they are stark raving LOCO! Keith

ethanedwards
October 16th, 2012, 05:51 PM
Just to clarify a point that has again been mentioned.
This taken from IMDb and is in our profile of the movie,

In the trivia section

Lauren Bacall's character's first name was a reference to Ward Bond.

Hope this answers the query

Peridot
October 18th, 2012, 09:42 AM
Don't know if this counts,but Wagon Train....The Andrew Hale Story. Excellent episode with John McIntyre long before he took over the actual Wagon Master's job after Ward's death. Super Story and showcases not only Ward but Charlie,(Frank McGrath), and Bill,(Terry Wilson), also. Keith


Whyever not?

Yesterday I screened The Shootist for the umpteenth time, planning to look only at the saloon decor...from the beginning I was once again drawn into the story and found myself watching every single second. Decor? What decor?

JB Books was a wonderful character, full of dignity and grace. He was a man determined to live and die on his own terms. As he went out he took with him some men who needed killing. I like that about him.

From my bias I must say that I believe Richard Boone (Mike Sweeney) was the best villain of the three. He projected extreme ill-will and menace for the brief time he was on screen. Lauren Bacall (Bond Rogers) seemed to shudder internally after meeting his character. The two other men were coral snakes, deadly when picked up, but Boone was a 4 meter rattlesnake, coiled and ready to strike with venom dripping from both fangs. We knew that Mike Sweeney had an agenda. Remember that Boone's line about retribution was improvised on the spot.

Oh, that John Wayne and Richard Boone had made more films together. Three wasn't enough for me. Then again, they did excel...

John Carradine's another favourite as the undertaker, Hezekiah Beckum. In his cameo he fleshes out an entire character of a sleazy man who will wrest every penny of profit he can from a man's corpse. Carradine went on to make 30 more appearances in film and television but this character stands out. It was perfect casting.

Dooley
October 18th, 2012, 11:30 AM
Is this the group watch thread?

Only kidding! It's fantastic that there is so much debate going on around the forum.

Hawkswill
October 18th, 2012, 12:06 PM
Is this the group watch thread?

Only kidding! It's fantastic that there is so much debate going on around the forum.

Sure is,and there is about to be a whole lot more, very shortly! KEITH

Hawkswill
October 18th, 2012, 03:18 PM
OK, here is what I posted on the NET. Then, there is the sketch....was going to do the walls, steps, etc. but decided it was more "striking" just plain.
What do yall think? On purpose, or just happenstance?

New finding by Keith Payne Wikipedia talk
After probably over 100 viewings of The Shootist, while getting ready to do some sketches I noticed something that I had never seen or read anything about in all these years. Made me think twice again of the way Duke felt about whether or not this would be his last movie. Not only was he very ill and the finishing of the film was in question, but, he named the landlady his best friend, Bond. However, there was one thing that has been overlooked all these years. And NOW, it stands out like a huge nugget of gold in a stream bed. In the final scene for Duke, he lies covered by Gillom's coat. Directly behind him in the middle of his body in the background is one of the symbols of Duke's entire life.....his extreme patriotism. What is it, why the American Bald Eagle, the symbol of our country, Duke's country. It took us 36 years to find this. Wonder if there are anymore nuggets like this out there. Remember, Duke learned from the best....Pappy Ford. When asked about symbolism which we know he used in all of his really good movies, he always said, "Just a job of 'werk'". Look again, do YOU honestly believe that eagle in that position at THAT time was an accident? Duke, you have once more reminded us of the true patriot you were. May you never stop doing so. Keith Payne

Pull out your disk and look...been there these 36 years. Duke and Ward are probably looking down saying,
"Took em long enough!" They just underestimated the effect of seeing Duke like that.....all eyes were on him. Keith
http://i1269.photobucket.com/albums/jj582/Hawkswill/Sketches/TheShootistPatriottotheend.jpg

Hawkswill
October 18th, 2012, 08:29 PM
Believe my answer to you disappeared like three others these last two days. Anyway,agree completely about RB. He was the most convincing of the villains. Even Gillom was afraid of him and told JB to be very careful of him as he was mean and hated him. I could and often do watch this movie over and over to see the expressions and hear the voice of our Duke who very convincingly played a dying man determined to go out a winner.....and, he DID! Keith



Whyever not?

Yesterday I screened The Shootist for the umpteenth time, planning to look only at the saloon decor...from the beginning I was once again drawn into the story and found myself watching every single second. Decor? What decor?

JB Books was a wonderful character, full of dignity and grace. He was a man determined to live and die on his own terms. As he went out he took with him some men who needed killing. I like that about him.

From my bias I must say that I believe Richard Boone (Mike Sweeney) was the best villain of the three. He projected extreme ill-will and menace for the brief time he was on screen. Lauren Bacall (Bond Rogers) seemed to shudder internally after meeting his character. The two other men were coral snakes, deadly when picked up, but Boone was a 4 meter rattlesnake, coiled and ready to strike with venom dripping from both fangs. We knew that Mike Sweeney had an agenda. Remember that Boone's line about retribution was improvised on the spot.

Oh, that John Wayne and Richard Boone had made more films together. Three wasn't enough for me. Then again, they did excel...

John Carradine's another favourite as the undertaker, Hezekiah Beckum. In his cameo he fleshes out an entire character of a sleazy man who will wrest every penny of profit he can from a man's corpse. Carradine went on to make 30 more appearances in film and television but this character stands out. It was perfect casting.

Hawkswill
October 19th, 2012, 07:30 AM
Did you mean that when RB dropped the table before he fell and he said, "That is for Albert"? That line? I didn't know that. KP


Whyever not?

Yesterday I screened The Shootist for the umpteenth time, planning to look only at the saloon decor...from the beginning I was once again drawn into the story and found myself watching every single second. Decor? What decor?

JB Books was a wonderful character, full of dignity and grace. He was a man determined to live and die on his own terms. As he went out he took with him some men who needed killing. I like that about him.

From my bias I must say that I believe Richard Boone (Mike Sweeney) was the best villain of the three. He projected extreme ill-will and menace for the brief time he was on screen. Lauren Bacall (Bond Rogers) seemed to shudder internally after meeting his character. The two other men were coral snakes, deadly when picked up, but Boone was a 4 meter rattlesnake, coiled and ready to strike with venom dripping from both fangs. We knew that Mike Sweeney had an agenda. Remember that Boone's line about retribution was improvised on the spot.

Oh, that John Wayne and Richard Boone had made more films together. Three wasn't enough for me. Then again, they did excel...

John Carradine's another favourite as the undertaker, Hezekiah Beckum. In his cameo he fleshes out an entire character of a sleazy man who will wrest every penny of profit he can from a man's corpse. Carradine went on to make 30 more appearances in film and television but this character stands out. It was perfect casting.

alamo221
October 19th, 2012, 02:29 PM
I thought Boone's character should have gone out with a lot more fight. Considering his feelings toward Books, they should have given him a better death scene in my opinion. Maybe due to Duke being sick, they decided not to do anything moe physical between the two (Duke stopped production for a bit due to being ill, and originally, Duke's double Jim Burk was going to do the entire shootout. Their was doubt Duke would be able to finish the film, but as we know, he did).

Hawkswill
October 19th, 2012, 02:43 PM
Hi there Alamo,
Yep, Peridot and I would have liked for RB to have had more, LOL!

Did you see below what I wrote for Wikipedia?

HAGO,KEITH

alamo221
October 19th, 2012, 02:46 PM
Hi there Alamo,
Yep, Peridot and I would have liked for RB to have had more, LOL!

Did you see below what I wrote for Wikipedia?

HAGO,KEITH

Howdy Hawk-I don't think it came thru-

Hawkswill
October 19th, 2012, 03:06 PM
Howdy Hawk-I don't think it came thru-


Hi Alamo,
Yep, scroll down. Talks about the new thing I found after 36 years. About Duke being ill and not sure he could finish the film.....and,then the Widipedia bit, then the sketch that shows it. HAGO, KEITH

alamo221
October 19th, 2012, 04:16 PM
Just to clarify a point that has again been mentioned.
This taken from IMDb and is in our profile of the movie,

In the trivia section

Hope this answers the query

I didn't know that-the character has the same name in the book, which was written before the film.

alamo221
October 19th, 2012, 04:18 PM
Hi Alamo,
Yep, scroll down. Talks about the new thing I found after 36 years. About Duke being ill and not sure he could finish the film.....and,then the Widipedia bit, then the sketch that shows it. HAGO, KEITH

In my case, I had to scroll BACK to see what you were talking about-LOL! Nice sketch!

Peridot
October 19th, 2012, 09:20 PM
Did you mean that when RB dropped the table before he fell and he said, "That is for Albert"? That line? I didn't know that. KP

Indeed, that's the line. RB was good with improv. Amazing, isn't it?

Peridot
October 19th, 2012, 09:31 PM
I thought Boone's character should have gone out with a lot more fight. Considering his feelings toward Books, they should have given him a better death scene in my opinion. Maybe due to Duke being sick, they decided not to do anything more physical between the two (Duke stopped production for a bit due to being ill, and originally, Duke's double Jim Burk was going to do the entire shootout. Their was doubt Duke would be able to finish the film, but as we know, he did).


I agree, that would have been great. Still Sweeney was hit at least twice through the table by Books and possibly three times. I'm currently screening a horror film with my son so I can't check.

Little help here, friends?

alamo221
October 19th, 2012, 09:48 PM
That was always a bit off for me. As I remember, Duke fires 2 shots at Sweeney as he approaches, but there's 3 separate holes in the table top.

The Tennesseean
October 19th, 2012, 10:25 PM
It's a great sketch, Keith. I must admit that I had never noticed the eagle thing.

One thing about Duke being ill, just in case there's any confusion: He had (since his lung was removed in '64) increasing difficulty breathing upon exertion, and simply walking while in higher elevations (i.e. where The Shootist was filmed), and in early '78 (he was in the hospital during the Oscars), he had his heart surgery in Boston, where they inserted a pig valve.

I know most, if not all of us KNOW this already, but over on another site (IMDb), and other places, people STILL insist he had cancer when he made this film, and it simply WAS NOT the case.

He also wasn't at death's door, as some imply, but he wasn't "in the pink" either.

Dick Cavett wrote a great piece about meeting JW for the first time while he and Becall were filming interiors at the studio backlot. I recommend it as a great read, but he makes the erroneous assumption (after JW's death) that he was battling the cancer (while filming this movie) that would eventually end his life but he wasn't.

As for Richard Boone's performance...I was quite happy with how he did. He rarely appeared in public (or made many films) in those years (he died in '81), as many years of alcohol abuse, not to mention a heavy smoking habit, caused RB's rugged good looks to deteriorate into a very haggard appearance, resembling nothing of what (just a short 10 years before) was a "maturing" matinee idol's graceful aging.

Side note...RB was supposed to play Doyle Lonnigan in "The Sting," the part that went to Robert Shaw, but was unable to do so due to his rapidly increasing inability to work sober. He supposedly did fine during The Shootist.

Hawkswill
October 19th, 2012, 11:06 PM
i agree, that would have been great. Still sweeney was hit at least twice through the table by books and possibly three times. I'm currently screening a horror film with my son so i can't check.

Little help here, friends?

three times! Kp

The Tennesseean
October 20th, 2012, 12:08 AM
Keith, I love your Gordon stories! Most people that worked with JW were sad that he didn't get to spend more time behind the camera, as he worked with the BEST in the industry, a never stopped learning!

Hawkswill
October 20th, 2012, 05:00 AM
May be true there Russ. But Duke was not really good behind the camera....sad thing to say, but true and documented in many ways. He WAS very good at suggestions, additions,etc. But as for actual direction......well, he was our Duke, so perhaps I shouldn't say more. However, he realized it....I am sure....why he just didn't take over. In later years he most definitely had more control, but he still was NOT the boss....the director was...good thing too. Duke Needed a director. Pappy had been his mainstay. Without him, he just was not capable of running the gamut. Jees, late here....did that make ANY sense.....does to me, but then, I am an old woman, LOL! He had great ideas.....just needed a director to carry them out. Duke, no matter what, was never a director......wanted to be....but realized it was not in the cards....so he kept acting.
I, personally am glad he did. I love his last films. And The SHOOTIST is like a memorial to me. What if he directed it and hired someone to play JB Books? Think I should stop there. HAGO, KEITH

alamo221
October 20th, 2012, 08:32 AM
three times! Kp

But they only show Duke firing 2 shots-weird...

Hawkswill
October 20th, 2012, 11:28 AM
[QUOTE=alamo221;119108]But they only show Duke firing 2 shots-weird...[/QUOTE

Hi Alamo,

JB took his holstered gun out and had both ready to fire. As someone else mentioned, the second shot came too close to the first to be from the same gun. So, those were the first two. He hesitated a bit, then fired the third shot from the gun that had been holstered. Hope that helps. Keith

alamo221
October 20th, 2012, 11:49 AM
that's what I always thought happened, but the way it's shown in the film, the scene seems to have a "cut" at that moment, so it looked as tho one shot was edited out for some reason, since you really only hear 2 shots ring out. In any case, RB should have had a better death scene.

Also, I don't feel The Tennesseean meant any disrespect in his comments, I had heard pretty much the same things about RB over the years as he mentioned. We're all friends, and sometimes things don't quite
come out too delicately when we're talking about our favorite actors and such. We're all fans tho, but we know these actors are human too. We all have frailties, and various reasons for them, so please try not to take our comments too seriously. We all have tremendous respect for Richard Boone and what he's gone thru, as well as all the other actors mentioned on the board. So many of our favorite stars had a lot of drama in their lives, like many of us, and sometimes mentioning these things makes them all the more human. As a side note, I loved Robert Shaw in The Sting, but I would have loved to see what RB could have done in the role.

Hawkswill
October 20th, 2012, 12:37 PM
Hi Alamo, I had checked this before, but just did again, for YOU, LOL. You can most definitely hear two shots first....the second almost right on top of the other. Then there is a slight pause and then the third. Listen again, you will hear the second one. And, once again, I agree.....RB should have had more. You DID see Peridot's remark about his adlib remark that it was for Albert didn't you? Managed to increase the part his own self, HAH!
HAGO, KEITH


that's what I always thought happened, but the way it's shown in the film, the scene seems to have a "cut" at that moment, so it looked as tho one shot was edited out for some reason, since you really only hear 2 shots ring out. In any case, RB should have had a better death scene.

Also, I don't feel The Tennesseean meant any disrespect in his comments, I had heard pretty much the same things about RB over the years as he mentioned. We're all friends, and sometimes things don't quite
come out too delicately when we're talking about our favorite actors and such. We're all fans tho, but we know these actors are human too. We all have frailties, and various reasons for them, so please try not to take our comments too seriously. We all have tremendous respect for Richard Boone and what he's gone thru, as well as all the other actors mentioned on the board. So many of our favorite stars had a lot of drama in their lives, like many of us, and sometimes mentioning these things makes them all the more human. As a side note, I loved Robert Shaw in The Sting, but I would have loved to see what RB could have done in the role.

alamo221
October 20th, 2012, 12:46 PM
Hi Alamo, I had checked this before, but just did again, for YOU, LOL. You can most definitely hear two shots first....the second almost right on top of the other.HAGO, KEITH

Thats what I meant when I said it almost seemed cut or edited-the overlapped shot along with the scene of the gunsmoke around Duke and a bit of shaky-cam. Just an awkward scene.

ethanedwards
October 20th, 2012, 07:31 PM
The discussion relating to Richard Boone was drifting too far off topic for this movie thread.
I have therefore moved the posts to
Pals Of The Saddle- Ricard Boone (http://www.dukewayne.com/showthread.php?t=2057)

Hawkswill
November 14th, 2012, 07:01 PM
The Shootist. What can I say. I think he acted better in this movie than any other he was in. The more I see it, the more I love it. I am so glad he was able to finish it as sick as he was. Really wish he could have lasted until he and Ronnie Howard made the new movie Duke was so excited about. He told Ron only "you and me could play it", or something of the sort. Sure would like to know what it was about. KEITH

Hawkswill
March 9th, 2013, 08:21 PM
CONTAINS SPOILERS.
Well, I am so glad to know that something I said a while back has gotten one of our younger members to watch THE SHOOTIST and to appreciate it for the masterpiece that it is. Thank you for letting me know that you did. As you know, I watch it probably about once a week and pretty much know the whole dialogue. Duke is just SO GREAT...so much better than anything I ever saw him in. He is outside of his normal character, yet still manages to stay within it. I am SO glad he was able to finish it as there had been a suggestion that Chuck Roberson do the shootout scenes. I believe the scenes at the very end with JB and Gillum were the epitome of the movie. No words.......as would have been Pappy's way........just action, moves, and looks. JB did NOT want Gillum to follow in the gun fighter's way. When Gillum looked at the gun, then JB's worried face, then threw the gun away, JB SMILED his last crooked smile for Gillum. And, the last scene looking at the covered body showed the symbol of patriotism that Duke felt he stood for..........the GOLDEN EAGLE......right in the very middle background on scene of JB's covered body, (another thing Duke learned from Pappy). I have said this before....how did we miss Duke's message to us all these years? When your hero is lying face down covered by a coat.......where do you eyes stay? You underestimated your fans' love for you Duke. That is why you and Ward are sitting up there saying "MOST of them STILL haven't realized it!"

Well, young fellah, glad you finally took the plunge. Hope you watch it many times more.........boy it is ever worth it! You see and learn something new every time. The Shootist.....now my favorite Duke Movie. KEITH
My External Hard Drive is down, or I would send the real screen cap, but this is the drawing I did for it. Now, for those of you who don't believe what Duke was trying to say with MAYBE his last movie.....just put on the Shootist, go to that part and STOP IT. You will see what I have drawn.....I just left out all the parts that weren't important. Keith

http://i1269.photobucket.com/albums/jj582/Hawkswill/Sketches/TheShootistPatriottotheend.jpg

alamo221
March 11th, 2013, 08:16 AM
Minor correction, Jim Burke, not "Bad" Chuck, doubled Duke for the shootout, and almost did the entire ending due to Duke's illness. Chuck only doubled Duke in the longshots at the very beginning of the film.

Hawkswill
March 16th, 2013, 12:50 PM
Minor correction, Jim Burke, not "Bad" Chuck, doubled Duke for the shootout, and almost did the entire ending due to Duke's illness. Chuck only doubled Duke in the longshots at the very beginning of the film.

Hi Alamo....just a misunderstanding. Never said Roberson DID some of the ending. It was discussed early on in the filming that he might HAVE to do it all. That would have meant no close-ups.....the finishing of the movie was still "up in the air" at that time. Later, I guess they decided Jim should do some of the strenuous parts that didn't show Duke's face. So glad Duke was able to do the scenes that counted....especially the ending with Gillum. Reams of dialogue were "spoken" in the looks between them.
Thanks for pointing that out, though.....had forgotten that Jim did a bit of the ending. KEITH

alamo221
March 16th, 2013, 12:55 PM
No problem, according to the interview Jim Burke did with Tim Lilley, Jim stated they had talked about him doing the entire ending. This was well into shooting due to Duke getting ill when time came to shoot the climax. He stated Duke got a lot better just in time to do the ending.

lasbugas
December 15th, 2013, 11:59 AM
http://i58.servimg.com/u/f58/11/97/59/03/wayne757.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=14634&u=11975903)

Kevin
December 15th, 2013, 12:56 PM
Thanks for the photo.

lasbugas
February 21st, 2014, 03:31 PM
http://i58.servimg.com/u/f58/11/97/59/03/a_way347.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=15227&u=11975903)

lasbugas
March 10th, 2014, 12:57 PM
http://i58.servimg.com/u/f58/11/97/59/03/a_way517.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=15400&u=11975903)

lasbugas
June 15th, 2014, 03:13 PM
http://i39.servimg.com/u/f39/11/97/59/03/a_way104.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=16259&u=11975903)

Tina
June 16th, 2014, 03:14 AM
Thank you for the photos from my favorite movie. I think this last film Duke made is really something special.

Best wishes, Tina

lasbugas
June 22nd, 2014, 03:42 AM
http://i39.servimg.com/u/f39/11/97/59/03/a_way184.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=16340&u=11975903)