View Full Version : They Were Expendable (1945)



ethanedwards
January 25th, 2006, 07:38 AM
THEY WERE EXPENDABLE

DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD
and ROBERT MONTGOMERY-uncredited
PRODUCED JOHN FORD/ CLIFF REID
SCREENPLAY BY Lt. COMMANDER FRANK WEAD
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/51ZVKYTZ86L_SL500.jpg..http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/74554487.jpg

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/They-Were-Expendable.jpg..http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c187/john-wayne/John%20Wayne/74554488.jpg

INFORMATION FROM IMDb

Plot Summary
The fall of the Phillippines to the Japanese in World War II, and the heroism and tragedy of the defenders, as exemplified by the story of one American PT boat squadron.
Summary written by Jim Beaver

Shortly after Pearl Harbor, a squadron of PT-boat crews in the Philipines must battle the Navy brass between skirmishes with the Japanese. The title says it all about the Navy's attitude towards the PT-boats and their crews.
Summary written by Anonymous

Based on the real life heroics of Lieutenants John Bulkeley (Brickley) and Robert Kelly (Ryan), the movie accurately depicts the defense of the Philippines by American PT Boats from December 1941 through April 1942 for which Lieutenant (later Vice Admiral) Bulkeley was awarded the Medal of Honor and Lieutenant Kelly the Navy Cross.
Summary written by Jim Graslie

Full Cast
Robert Montgomery .... Lt. John Brickley
John Wayne .... Lt. (j.g.) 'Rusty' Ryan
Donna Reed .... 2nd Lt. Sandy Davys
Jack Holt .... Gen. Martin
Ward Bond .... 'Boats' Mulcahey
Marshall Thompson .... Ens. 'Snake' Gardner
Paul Langton .... Ens. 'Andy' Andrews
Leon Ames .... Maj. James Morton
Arthur Walsh .... Seaman Jones
Donald Curtis .... Lt. (j.g.) 'Shorty' Long/voice on radio announcing fall of Bataan
Cameron Mitchell .... Ens. George Cross
Jeff York .... Ens. Tony Aiken
Murray Alper .... 'Slug' Mahan
Harry Tenbrook .... Squarehead Larson
Jack Pennick .... Doc
Alex Havier .... Benny Lecoco
Charles Trowbridge .... Adm. Blackwell
Robert Barrat .... Gen. Douglas MacArthur
Bruce Kellogg .... Elder Tompkins
Tim Murdock .... Ens. L. D. Brant
Louis Jean Heydt .... Captain 'Ohio' Carter
Russell Simpson .... 'Dad' Knowland
Vernon Steele .... Army doctor
Pedro de Cordoba .... Priest (scenes deleted)
Philip Ahn .... Army orderly (uncredited)
Steve Barclay .... Naval officer (uncredited)
Bill Barnum .... Boat crew member (uncredited)
Betty Blythe .... Officer's wife (uncredited)
Danny Borzage .... Boat crew member (uncredited)
Al Bridge .... Lieutenant Colonel (uncredited)
George Bruggeman .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Charles Calhoun .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
James Carlisle .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
John Carlyle .... Lt. James (uncredited)
Jack Carrington .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
Bruce Carruthers .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Tony Carson .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Jack Cheatham .... Commander (uncredited)
Fred Coby .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
Roger Cole .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
Jane Crowley .... Officer's wife (uncredited)
William B. Davidson .... Hotel manager (uncredited)
Marjorie Davies .... Nurse (uncredited)
Patrick Davis .... Pilot (uncredited)
Gary Delmar .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Larry Dods .... Boat crew member (uncredited)
Ernest Dominguez .... Filipino boy (uncredited)
Frank Donahue .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
William 'Red' Donahue .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
George Economides .... Bartender's child (uncredited)
Michael Economides .... Bartender's child (uncredited)
Blake Edwards .... Boat crewman (uncredited)
Frank Eldredge .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
John Epper .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
Jim Farley .... (uncredited)
Charles Ferguson .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
Leonard Fisher .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Lee Tung Foo .... Asian bartender (uncredited)
Wallace Ford .... (uncredited)
Art Foster .... Boat crew member (uncredited)
Almeda Fowler .... Officer's wife (uncredited)
Mary Jane French .... Lost nurse (uncredited)
Jon Gilbreath .... Submarine commander (uncredited)
Duke Green .... PT-41 boat starboard torpedoman (uncredited)
Sherry Hall .... Marine major (uncredited)
Del Hill .... Boat crew member (uncredited)
Robert Homans .... Bartender at Manila Hotel (uncredited)
Vincent Isla .... Filipino schoolteacher (uncredited)
Dick Karl .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Michael Kirby .... Boat crewman (uncredited)
Michael Kostrick .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Paul Kruger .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Stubby Kruger .... Boat crewman (uncredited)
Jack Lee .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Donald S. Lewis .... Officer at airport (uncredited)
Jack Lorenz .... Man in admiral's office (uncredited)
Leota Lorraine .... Officer's wife (uncredited)
Trina Lowe .... Gardner's girlfriend (uncredited)
Jack Luden .... Naval Air Captain (uncredited)
Ted Lundigan .... Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
James Magill .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
George Magrill .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Eve March .... Nurse (uncredited)
Kermit Maynard .... Airport Officer (uncredited)
Merrill McCormick .... Wounded Officer at Airport (uncredited)
Frank McGrath .... Slim, bearded CPO (uncredited)
Leonard Mellin .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Karl Miller .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Henry Mirelez .... Filipino Boy (uncredited)
Margaret Morton .... Bartender's Wife (uncredited)
Jack Mower .... Officer (uncredited)
Forbes Murray .... Navy Captain (uncredited)
Charles Murray Jr. .... Jeep Driver (uncredited)
Bill Neff .... Submarine Skipper/Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
Bill Nind .... Officer at Airport (uncredited)
Wedgwood Nowell .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Robert Emmett O'Connor .... Silver Dollar bartender (uncredited)
Max Ong .... Mayor of Cebu (uncredited)
Franklin Parker .... Naval Officer (uncredited)
Frank Pershing .... Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
Nino Pipitone Jr. .... Bartender's Child (uncredited)
Dan Quigg .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Robert Shelby Randall .... Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
Clifford Rathjen .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Joey Ray .... Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
William McKeever Riley .... Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
Jack Ross .... Officer at Airport (uncredited)
John Roy .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Harold Schlickenmayer .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Phil Schumacher .... Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
Ernest Seftig .... Naval Officer (uncredited)
Jack Semple .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Brent Shugar .... Officer at Airport (uncredited)
Sam Simone .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Reginald Simpson .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Leslie Sketchley .... Marine Orderly (uncredited)
Ralph Soncuya .... Filipino Orderly (uncredited)
Leonard Stanford .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Larry Steers .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Sammy Stein .... Sammy, Boat crewman (uncredited)
Jack Stoney .... Boat Crew Member (uncredited)
Robert Strong .... Officer at Airport (uncredited)
Roy Thomas .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Bob Thom .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Dick Thorne .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Pacita Tod-Tod .... Nightclub singer (uncredited)
Brad Towne .... Man in Admiral's Office (uncredited)
Jack Trent .... Officer at Airport (uncredited)
Tom Tyler .... Captain at airport (uncredited)
Emmett Vogan .... Naval Doctor (uncredited)
Eleanore Vogel .... Officer's Wife (uncredited)
Hansel Warner .... Officer at Airport (uncredited)
Billy Wilkerson .... Sgt. Smith (uncredited)
Roque Ybarra Jr. .... Bartender's Child (uncredited)

Writing credits
William L. White (book)
Frank Wead (screenplay) (as Frank Wead Comdr. U.S.N. [Ret.])

Original Music
Herbert Stothart

Cinematography
Joseph H. August (as Joseph H. August Lt. Comdr. U.S.N.R.)

Other crew
Robert Montgomery .... director: rear projection plates (uncredited)

Stunts
Jack Stoney

Trivia
Robert Montgomery was a real-life PT skipper in World War 2. He helped direct some of the PT sequences for the film when John Ford was unavailable due to health reasons.

Filmed in Miami, the closing shot with the lighthouse is the Cape Florida Lighthouse, in what is today the Cape Florida State Park. The lighthouse withstood and was the scene of an Seminole Indian attack in 1835.

The movie was based on the real live exploits of John Bulkeley, a World War II Medal of Honor Recipient.

This movie was based on William L. White's book "They Were Expendable", which covered the exploits of Lieutenants John Bulkeley and Robert Kelly. Lt. Robert Kelly and U.S. Army Nurse "Peggy Smith" sued MGM, John Wayne and Donna Reed for their portrayal of them in the film. Although the film follows the book fairly closely, it does portray Lt. Kelly as impetuous and "hell bound for glory." Nurse Smith is shown romantically involved with Lt. Kelly. Wayne, Reed and MGM settled out of court for a nominal sum (less than $5,000.00). This event prompted movies to start adding disclaimers such as "All characters are fictional. Any resemblance to actual people is purely by coincidence and any of their actions in actual historical events is not accurate".

The real-life Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 3 in the Philippines at the beginning of World War II was equipped with six 77-foot Elco PT boats, all either lost in combat or destroyed to prevent capture. In the film, the Squadron 3 boats are represented by two 80-foot Elco and four 78-foot Huckins PT boats.

"Dad" Knowlton, the shipwright who repairs the PT boats, has a poignant little scene in which he refuses to leave the place he's lived and worked for forty years, although the Japanese are advancing. Rusty Ryan, John Wayne's character, finally leaves Dad sitting alone on his porch with a rifle in his hands and a jug of moonshine between his knees, as "Red River Valley" plays in the background. How eerily reminiscent of The Grapes of Wrath (1940), which is particularly appropriate because Dad is played by Russell Simpson, whom John Ford directed as Pa Joad in 1940.

During the shooting of this movie, John Ford had put John Wayne down every chance he got, because Wayne had not enlisted to fight in World War II. Ford commanded a naval photographic unit during the war rising to the rank of captain and thought Wayne a coward for staying behind. After months of heaping insults on Wayne's head, costar Robert Montgomery finally approached the director and told him that if he was putting Wayne down for Montgomery's benefit (Montgomery had served in the war), that he needed to stop immediately. This brought the tough-as-nails director to tears and he stopped abusing Wayne.

When the officers are gathered around the dining table, they stand for a toast, Rusty misses and the drink goes down the front of his shirt, then quickly cuts.

In a scene on the docks, a ship named the Lucien P. Libby is in the background. In the biography "John Ford: A Bio-bibliography" by Bill Levy, there is a reference to John Ford being influenced by two teachers during his four years at Portland High School. One was an English teacher, Lucien Libby, who "helped the boy with his writing, encouraged Ford's reading, and stimulated thinking with witty comic teaching."

First war movie feature of John Ford.

This is one of a handful of feature film movies that have featured the story of the World War II Battle of Bataan. They include Bataan (1943), So Proudly We Hail! (1943); They Were Expendable (1945) and Back to Bataan (1945).

The film covers the World War II Battle of Bataan and the place Bataan which is a Central Luzon region province on Luzon island in the Philippines and occupies the whole of the Bataan Peninsula on the island.

Goofs
* Factual errors: Both American aircraft shown in the film (a Piper J5A observation plane and a Douglas C-47 transport) carry the national insignia markings of a white star in a blue roundel, which was authorized on August 18, 1942. This is incorrect for the period depicted in the film (early December 1941 through late April 1942), when U.S. insignia was a white star inside a blue roundel with a red ball in the middle of the white star.

* Anachronisms: By the time this movie was made, the class of PT boat used in the Philippine Islands was not available. They substituted 80-foot ELCOs for the 78-foot ELCOs actually used in Manila Bay.

* Continuity: When Lt. Sandy Davys attends the 'party', Lt. JG 'Rusty' Ryan takes a big swig of his drink, spilling some of it down his face and shirt, yet in the next scene, he's completely dry.

* Revealing mistakes: The Japanese air attack at the beginning of the movie shows the aircraft strafing the PT boats. None of the aircraft flying in the scene are carrying bombs, nor are there attachments on the wings for carrying bombs.

* Continuity: During the aircraft strafing scenes when LTjg Ryan is injured, the planes are attacking from astern of the boats. The bullet strikes on the boat start from the starboard bow and go across the boat to the port side, indicating a frontal attack.

* Continuity: When Brick is briefing his officers on the route they are to take in evacuating McArthur, he draws the route on the map in a thick, heavy line. Seconds later, when the map is picked up to be folded, the lines are gone.

* Factual errors: A frame at the end of the movie said, "We shall return - General Douglas MacArthur". In fact, the White House tried to get the general to change his famous quote to "we" but he refused, saying he failed to see the purpose. It should read, "I shall return."

Memorable Quotes (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0038160/quotes)

Filming Locations
Florida Keys, Florida, USA
Florida, USA
Key Biscayne, Florida, USA
Melville, Rhode Island, USA
Miami, Florida, USA

Watch the Trailer:-

cHtdB97uA08

ethanedwards
January 25th, 2006, 07:39 AM
They Were Expendable is a 1945 American war film directed by John Ford
and starring Robert Montgomery and John Wayne and featuring Donna Reed.

The film is based on the book by William L. White, relating the story of the exploits
of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron Three, a PT boat unit defending the Philippines
against Japanese invasion during the Battle of the Philippines (1941–42) in World War II.
It features the unit's commanding officer and Medal of Honor recipient Lieutenant John D. Bulkeley,
and Lieutenant (j.g.) Robert Kelly, one of his boat skippers.

The characters of John Brickley (Montgomery) and Rusty Ryan (Wayne)
are fictionalizations of the actual subjects.
Both the film and the book – which was a best seller and had excerpts published in Reader's Digest and Life
– depict actions which did not occur, but were believed to be real during the war;
the film is noted for its verisimilitude.

A great war movie, well acted and directed,
following some, real life stories, as written by Frank 'Spig' Wead.

Although Duke was relegated in the cast list, Ford's little
way of reminding Duke, of his 'lack' of military service,
he acquitted himself well, once again proving his worth,
of acting a leader, if not one in practice.

Robert Montgomery, on leave from the forces, and Donna Reed, played well in their parts.
Ward Bond, re-covering from a shattered leg, which you never see, did well.
Unfortunately, the war was over, when the film was released in December 1945,
the public were tired of war.

The film flopped.

Had it been released a few months earlier, it would have been considered
morale boosting, and part of the war effort,it's success, would have been much greater.

User Review

A film about following orders no matter how painful
31 January 2002 | by chisum (Hartlepool England)

One reveiwer critices this film about lack of action he misses the point,all the characters are well developed which makes the ending so painfull. The acting is first rate every part is played with a great belief,,there are so many great scenes that touch the heart.The men are bonded together by their actions and when the bonds are broken through death or orders it hurts us all. Donna Reed is gorgeous to look at ,only a small role but well acted. At the end of the film you feel a lump in your throat and a tear forms in your eye,I love this movie.9/10

SXViper
January 26th, 2006, 12:14 AM
I liked the film allot and would say it was one of the top 2-3 war films that Duke made. Waw not a huge fan of Montgomery but, he did a good job in his part. Now Donna Reed, WOW!! She was very nice looking in that movie.
The other thing I liked about the film was the PT boat's, we have very few movies that focus on the PT Boats and there crews throughout a entire movie and its nice to see the sailors get some recognition.

chester7777
February 3rd, 2006, 10:24 PM
Wow, this is one of my favorite films! I can't believe I haven't commented on it yet.

As a retired shallow water Navy vet, with 4 years active and 21 years in the reserves, the majority of time was spent working as a Navy diver in and around smaller piers and small boats. The first time I watched this movie was on TV, on the Turner Broadcasting Network. Mr. Turner had made colorized versons of several JW movies, this one among them. While watching this movie in color, I was impressed by the brilliant blue water and tropical green trees and the story itself. I really appreciated the sense of hopelessness that this movie conveyed, as I'm sure many people who were there actually felt that way.

Chester :newyear:

Harry00
May 11th, 2006, 03:01 PM
Sorry people, I am kind of mentallY ill (politically uncorrect term "crazy.) Undeerstand oot of the westerms, but kind of confused about the war pictures. Could Nyone summarize what this film wass abotu?

pegwil54
May 11th, 2006, 04:08 PM
Here is a summery from IMDb (internet movie data base).
Plot Summary for
They Were Expendable (1945)
Shortly after Pearl Harbor, a squadron of PT-boat crews in the Philipines must battle the Navy brass between skirmishes with the Japanese. The title says it all about the Navy's attitude towards the PT-boats and their crews.

Summary written by Anonymous

The fall of the Phillippines to the Japanese in World War II, and the heroism and tragedy of the defenders, as exemplified by the story of one American PT boat squadron.

Summary written by Jim Beaver {jumblejim@prodigy.net}

Based on the real life heroics of Lieutenants John Bulkeley (Brickley) and Robert Kelly (Ryan), the movie accurately depicts the defense of the Philippines by American PT Boats from December 1941 through April 1942 for which Lieutenant (later Vice Admiral) Bulkeley was awarded the Medal of Honor and Lieutenant Kelly the Navy Cross.

Summary written by Jim Graslie {graz@telebyte.net}

This might help a little.

Senta
September 23rd, 2006, 12:23 AM
It's one of the best war movies I ever seen. And one of the greatest things in it that it was done about a fall, not victory. I think it can't be great in box office even during the war, because people always want to see victories (at the end at least) And here is no victory at the end. I always wonder what happened with all these soldiers and sailors left there who wasn't evacuated?
Regards,
Senta

ethanedwards
September 23rd, 2006, 03:23 AM
Hi Vera,

Unfortunatley, the ones left behind,
were left to the mercy, or lack of mercy
of the invading forces.
Many suffered at the ends of enemy,
as P.O.W.s, with many never making it.
However, of course, many did survive,
until the islands were re-taken,
and live to tell their stories.

Best Wishes

William T Brooks
September 23rd, 2006, 08:50 AM
I had many of my family that served in the Pacific in W.W. 2 and the stories that they would tell would make your Hair Stand On End. :fear:

Vera; But the worst were told to me by a Young Man that Rented a Room from my Grandmother right after the World War 2 in Phoenix, Arizona. His Name was Johnny Cutchback and He was one of the Men that were on the "Japanese Death March" in the Philippines after the Islands Fell to the Japs.

He had Bayonet Scars all over his Body that the Japs gave to Him to Keep all of the Prisoners moving on the Death March! And He said that if you did not keep moving they would Bayonet You to Death Right on the Spot !!! :(

We became Hunting Partners in the Mid 1940s. We would sit around the Camp Fire at the end of the days Hunting and He would tell Stories about the Death March and I still have Bad Dreams about the Stories that told me, and that was over 60 Years Ago!!! :fear2:

Bill :cowboy:

Senta
September 23rd, 2006, 10:50 AM
How horrible!
Is it Japaneese Death March which is shown in Back to Bataan?
I reread pages about They Were Expendable in Dan Fords book and in Duke biography the Shooting Star. Many interesting facts. John Ford knew Bulkeley (his name was changed to Brickley in the script) during invasion at Normandy, he was at his PT boat during it.
But the most strange fact is that Kelly (whose part were played by Duke) and the nurse went to the court and received money for their claim against this movie.
I'm really can't understand with what they were not satisfied. The romance between Ryan and Sandy are quite modest.
Regards,
Vera :rolleyes:

arthurarnell
September 25th, 2006, 01:24 PM
Hi Vera

As you seem to be very interested in They Were Expendable I've found a later picture of John Bulkeley the man the Robert Montgomery character was based on.


[ATTACH]725]

Regards

Arthur

Senta
September 25th, 2006, 02:22 PM
Hi Arthur,
Thank you so much. He seems to be very nice man in the photo. I've read that he was very much alike Montgomery. So I think Ford cast Duke not for the learding part not because he wasn't in the service, but mainly because he was better for the other part.

Had you read The Shooting Star? There is interesting episode when Ford, Montgomery, Duke and Wead was at Fords house descussing the script and Duke feeled so ashamed that he was the only one who wasn't at service and in civilian clothers that he cryed at bathroom. What do you think, is it true?

Another interesting fact that Ford donated all money for the directing to his project for the veterans. But Duke and other actors kept their salaries for their own.

Regards,
Vera :rolleyes:

ethanedwards
September 26th, 2006, 05:26 AM
Originally posted by Senta@Sep 23 2006, 03:50 PM
How horrible!
Is it Japaneese Death March which is shown in Back to Bataan?

Had you read The Shooting Star? There is interesting episode when Ford, Montgomery, Duke and Wead was at Fords house descussing the script and Duke feeled so ashamed that he was the only one who wasn't at service and in civilian clothers that he cryed at bathroom. What do you think, is it true?

Another interesting fact that Ford donated all money for the directing to his project for the veterans.

Regards,
Vera :rolleyes:

34803


Vera,

Yes it is the Death March, that is depicted in
Back to Bataan

Here is a link, not nice reading however, with some information for you

Bataan Death March (http://history.acusd.edu/gen/st/~ehimchak/death_march.html)



About Duke crying!
I've not read that anywhere, but according to John Wayne:American
Ford kept getting on Duke's back about not saluting correctly, so much so
that Montgomery intervened to such an extent, that he reduced FORD to tears!!

Quite correct Vera, Ford donated his entire $300K salary, to build a living memorial,
for his Field Photographic Unit, a tribute for comrades who had died defending their country.

Best Wishes

Senta
September 26th, 2006, 08:01 AM
Hi Keith,
Thank you for the link. terrible and sad information. This make end of the film even more tragic.
I saw the terrible conditions in the Jap war camps in the famous movie The Bridge over the river Kway, even if I don't quite like this movie in the whole.
Regards,
Vera

arthurarnell
September 26th, 2006, 11:03 AM
Hi Vera

It strange how threads cross over

In one of my earlier posts I wrote how I came to get Shooting Star. We visited the town where Charles Dickens lived most of his life and I bought the book in a small bookshop.

Ref Ford and Wayne around the time They Were Expendable was made it is interesting to look at what was happening around that time and his use of John Wayne.

In 1939 he made Wayne's name with Stagecoach, he then made three films on the trot starring Henry Fonda. He then used Wayne once again for The Long Voyage Home.
The eight films without Wayne (all beit some with a military educational theme.
He then went back to Wayne for They Were Expendable.
He then treturned to Henry Fonda to make two films. Then a third - Fort Apache featuring both men.

In an earlier thread I think I put up a case that Ford deliberately ignored Wayne during the early 1940s and used him deliberately in They Were Expendable to humiliate him.
If you read some of the incidents in the picture particularly with regard to the incident of the sghattering of the windscreen, I don't think that the picture was a happy experiencefor Duke

Regards

Arthur

Senta
September 26th, 2006, 03:10 PM
Hi Arthur,
I forgot that is was Shooting star, because your story about reading Wayne biography in a bus with Dickens fun was really amasing. Dickens is one of my all times favorites, but i like your story because I'm often feel myself in the same situation. My great interest to Duke seems to the most of my friends as something curios and funny. Mostly becouse my profession and education are all around serios literature.

It is interesting points you make about Ford and Wayne. I didn't count his films that way. But Duke himself never blamed him for that.

And we can be sure thankful to Ford for some of most memorable Duke performances. And I myself like Ford films very much. And have a great interest for his works.

About incedents I've read in Dan Fords book, how Duke ran after one prop man with the hammer and Ford stopped him.

But what do you think about the Shooting Star. I'm many times cought myself with impression of unsure is it right or wrong. But I didn't read much about Duke. It is the only real biography, other book I have about him is memories.

Regards,
Vera :rolleyes:

Tbone
September 26th, 2006, 03:34 PM
Originally posted by arthurarnell@Sep 26 2006, 10:03 AM
If you read some of the incidents in the picture particularly with regard to the incident of the sghattering of the windscreen, I don't think that the picture was a happy experiencefor Duke

Regards

Arthur

34899



Arthur,

What happened with the windscreen? I had not heard this part of the story before.

Thanks,

arthurarnell
September 26th, 2006, 05:23 PM
Hi Tbone

During the making of the film the PT boat was supposed to be strafed by a Japanese plane.
To get the effect small ball bearings were going to be used with shatterproof glass. One of the crew forgot to put the shatterproof glass in place and when the ball bearings hit the normal glass the windscreen shattered in Duke's face. He went after the culprit with a hammer in his hand.
Ford seeing the incident said that's one of my crew you're after to which Wayne repled it also my face.

Regards

Arthur

arthurarnell
September 26th, 2006, 05:26 PM
Hi Vera

What you say is true it is one of the few books wroteabout John Wayne while he was still alive. I think there are parts that Wayne wasn't happy with, and some of it I think is innaccurate, but it is not as bad or as inaccurate as Carpoze's book which I read and thought was abysmal.



Regards

Arthur

ethanedwards
September 26th, 2006, 08:13 PM
Hi Vera,

Arthur has mentioned the windscreen incident,
which was part of Ford's constant, riding of Duke.
Ford resented the fact, that Duke's only uniform
was one issued by the wardrobe department.
It was Stagecoach re-visited, with the golden boy,
in this case Montgomery doing no wrong.
Everything, Duke did, was wrong, with Ford,
constantly calling him a 'clumsy B*******',
and a 'big oaf'.
Ford even said that Duke did not how to walk, or talk like a sailor,
which really upset Duke, cause if nothing else.he moved well!!
It was total humiliation, about the saluting,
which resulted in Montgomery,
leaning over Ford's chair and saying,

Don't ever talk to Duke like that. You ought to be ashamed

As Arthur has pointed out, the film was not a happy
experience for anyone concerned with it

Senta
September 27th, 2006, 12:03 PM
Originally posted by ethanedwards@Sep 27 2006, 03:13 AM
As Arthur has pointed out, the film was not a happy
experience for anyone concerned with it

34932


Anyway it became a masterpiece

:rolleyes:

arthurarnell
September 27th, 2006, 01:40 PM
Hi

It is also a strange quirk of Fords that he told everyone that he had never watched the completed version of They Were Expendable, even years after he swore that he didn't like the film and therefore hadn't bothered to watch the complete version.

You make of that what you will.


Regards

Arthur

Senta
September 27th, 2006, 02:54 PM
Originally posted by arthurarnell@Sep 27 2006, 08:40 PM
Hi

It is also a strange quirk of Fords that he told everyone that he had never watched the completed version of They Were Expendable, even years after he swore that he didn't like the film and therefore hadn't bothered to watch the complete version.

You make of that what you will.
Regards

Arthur

34974


It is strange. may be he was dissapointed by something. Was there some unused, cut material?
Regards,
Vera :rolleyes:

ethanedwards
September 27th, 2006, 08:44 PM
Hi Vera,

Apparently in later life Ford admitted that he never wanted
to make, this film, but was ordered to do so,
by the studio bosses who had supported his war documentaries.
He didn't have any confidence in MGM to come up with
a substantial war film, and his distaste for non-serving
Hollywood actors, including Duke)
had to be overcome!!
Fort had an accident, towards the end of filming, and gave directional roles to Montgomery,
a final swipe at Duke and his War service record.

The film was artfully made, but the timing of it's release was unfortunate!!

From my Initial review,


Unfortunately, the war was over, when the film was released in December 1945,
the public were tired of war.The film flopped.
Had it been released a few months earlier, it would have been considered
morale boosting, and part of the war effort,it's success, would have been much greater.

Did you know, that there are no Japanese Soldiers or Sailors,
seen anywhere in the film!!!!!

Best Wishes

SXViper
September 27th, 2006, 11:48 PM
Originally posted by ethanedwards@Sep 23 2006, 02:23 AM
Hi Vera,

Unfortunatley, the ones left behind,
were left to the mercy, or lack of mercy
of the invading forces.
Many suffered at the ends of enemy,
as P.O.W.s, with many never making it.
However, of course, many did survive,
until the islands were re-taken,
and live to tell their stories.

Best Wishes

34792


Vera, Bill, Keith, and anybody else interested.

If you want to see what happened to one of the death camps at the end of World War 2, try getting a copy of the movie "The Great Raid". Its the true story of a group of US Army Rangers who snuck into a camp near Cabutuaan in the Philipines during the last days of the war in the Philipines. The action and story itself is true to what actually happened but the parts involving the love story are just Hollywood sticking its nose into the film. I would still recommend it and I have seen it 3-4 times and I like it. The raid is the single largest prison camp rescue ever with over 500 soldiers/sailers being rescued, truly a incredible feat.

I have a book on which the movie was based on and it is a excellent book. Its is called "Ghost Soldiers: The Forgotten Epic Story of World War II's Most Dramatic Mission" by Hampton Sides.

What the Japanese did was nothing short of the worst things that were done to the holocaust victims, except that most of these people were soldiers and sailors. The japanese thought that you should die fighting and never surrender even if it was inevitable thnat you couldn't win. They treated all those people on the Bataan Death March as cowards and had no respect for them at all.

ethanedwards
September 28th, 2006, 04:36 AM
Hi Todd,

Thanks for that information.

I haven't seen the film you mentioned,
but will certainly look out for it.
There are certainly many web-sites
(similiar to the one I posted for Vera)
relating to the 'March' and the
details in those, makes for pretty horrific reading!

Thanks

General Sterling Price
February 24th, 2007, 10:35 PM
I think that in a way, They Were Expendable really ended with a victory, in that the top brass finally saw the value of the PT boats...but obviously the circumstances were tragic. Interesting too that Ward Bond's crutch was for the real leg injury he sustained when hit by a car. Before the scene where he was shot in the PT boat, Bond is never seen walking in the film...because he couldn't without the crutch. We just watched the film for the third time...wow it was good.

GSP

etsija
March 12th, 2007, 08:31 AM
"They were expendable" doesn't make me very interested in the subject (all these films plus some others in a row are starting to make that effect, though!), but it sure has style that films like Back to Bataan completely lack. Whatever Ford was in personal life, as a filmmaker he was a thoroughbred artist. In this he makes poetry out of war and shows beauty in most unexpectable things.

Does the question about the leading lady in a 1932 movie make any sense to somebody - or is it just absurd humour?

A Girl Named Jen
March 13th, 2007, 04:31 PM
Hey again everyone!

I just remembered something else I wanted to tell all y'all. I doubt anyone else still cares or remembers, but my very first post here was to ask what song was playing when Duke dances with Donna Reed in They Were Expendable.

About a year ago, I eventually found out from a woman I know. She has a friend who used to work with the great John Ford. (Neat, huh?)

It's called "Marcheta" and at the following website you can hear some of it sung by a good old-fashioned cowboy in his own right, Mr. Gene Autry. Finding this out was one of those sigh of relief moments for me. :present:

http://www.geneautry.com/musicmovies/musiccds/gas_1950tvrecordings.html

I would have replied to my original thread but it's too durned old. Alas.

http://www.dukewayne.com/thread422.html

SXViper
March 13th, 2007, 11:51 PM
Hi Jen, glad you found your answer and good to see you back here. hope to see you around more.

arthurarnell
March 14th, 2007, 02:51 AM
Hi Jen

Likewise glad to hear from you again. And its a good song.


Regards

Arthur

A Girl Named Jen
March 15th, 2007, 10:44 AM
I thought there would be a longer clip of Mr. Autry singing the song, but to no avail. Perhaps elsewhere on the web.

I recognize so many names here, but it appears that Chance and smokey are missing along with Baron von Rassilon. Has anyone seen them about? What about itdo (Roland)? :ohwell:

chester7777
March 15th, 2007, 11:21 AM
Hey, Jen, good to see you again. I posted a welcome back in another thread, but definitely wanted to post here, as I do remember you asking about the song in one of my favorite films. At the time, I searched high and low for it, to no avail, so I'm glad you found an answer. I listened to the Gene Autry clip and ended up buying the 3-disc set! The money is going to a good cause, it's going to support the Western Heritage Museum down in Los Angeles.

smokey is taking classes, so isn't here very often, but when she comes back, she'll be happy to see you've returned. CHANCE has been busy dealing with "life issues" recently, so hasn't been around too much, but he'll be back. The Baron . . . I don't know what has happened to him. itdo left due to differences regarding political discussion and how they were moderated ( or not). I also think that he was seeking a higher plane of discussion regarding Duke. He was very knowledgeable from a cinematography perspective, and looking for like minds. We do miss him. He also indicated that his job was keeping him busier.

Chester :newyear:

A Girl Named Jen
March 19th, 2007, 10:14 AM
HI Chester:

I'm glad you liked the Autry discs and that the money is going to a good cause. I hadn't even noticed that.

I'm sorry to hear about members who aren't around any longer. I agree that itdo was definitely on a different level, which is why I always looked forward to hearing from him. His posts were always very informative and certainly more objective with regard to JW; his thoughts seemed to come from a critical, film-appreciation sort of perspective, and it's always good to have different perspectives. Oh well.

It always makes me kind of sad when people can't see past their religious or political differences. If I disagreed about something someone here said, I would just choose not to react and let it pass. One of my other great cinematic interests is the musical star Gene Kelly. (I know; he couldn't be much more different from John Wayne, but there you have it.) Though it pains me a bit to say it about someone whose work I admire so much, he was known for being very left-wing and even got accidentally entangled in communism through his first wife, who was far more hard-core liberal than even he was. I used to post quite frequently at a GK forum and occasionally the conversation drifted into politics. I am more right-wing and conservative myself, and I tended to just ignore those conversations. It's not worth getting involved in something ugly, and risk alienating yourself from a great discussion about a common interest. Everyone's entitled to their opinion and I'm not about to change anyone's mind over night, so I let stuff go.

Just to relate this all to JW, I don't know about any time Duke met with Gene Kelly, though I do know that GK praised him in writing once for how gracefully he moved in spite of (or perhaps because of) his masculinity. He was always trying to prove that dancing could be masculine, and that men who danced should always maintain their masculinity. He didn't like that people always associate dancing with being a sissy.

Anyway, I digress. Sorry! :blush: Thanks for the update!

Stumpy
March 19th, 2007, 10:24 AM
One of my other great cinematic interests is the musical star Gene Kelly. (I know; he couldn't be much more different from John Wayne, but there you have it.) Though it pains me a bit to say it about someone whose work I admire so much, he was known for being very left-wing and even got accidentally entangled in communism through his first wife, who was far more hard-core liberal than even he was. I used to post quite frequently at a GK forum and occasionally the conversation drifted into politics. I am more right-wing and conservative myself, and I tended to just ignore those conversations. It's not worth getting involved in something ugly, and risk alienating yourself from a great discussion about a common interest. Everyone's entitled to their opinion and I'm not about to change anyone's mind over night, so I let stuff go.

Just to relate this all to JW, I don't know about any time Duke met with Gene Kelly, though I do know that GK praised him in writing once for how gracefully he moved in spite of (or perhaps because of) his masculinity. He was always trying to prove that dancing could be masculine, and that men who danced should always maintain their masculinity. He didn't like that people always associate dancing with being a sissy.

I never knew Gene fell on the left side of the political spectrum - in fact, that's the first I'd heard of it. That's what I liked about the older generation of movie stars; they kept their political opinions to themselves. I've read that Burt Lancaster, Gregory Peck and of course
Paul Newman were/are extremely liberal but you'd never have known it from their movies.

I've also never thought dancing was sissified - I'd give anything to be able to dance like Gene or Fred could.

BTW, Jen, Gene has what I think was one of his best movies out on DVD - "The Three Musketeers"

A Girl Named Jen
March 19th, 2007, 12:52 PM
Ah, Stumpy... how great is it that you know about the release of The 3 Ms on DVD (finally)? It's certainly a fun movie, and one of GK's few non-musical films that's a joy to watch and allows him to use his charm. He modeled himself after Douglas Fairbanks in his role as d'Artagnan. It reminds me somewhat of Scaramouche, another fun MGM film from the same time with swashbuckling in it. Stewart Granger is so good in that kind of role.

I'm glad that you don't see dancing as sissified. A lot of girls would give anything to be able to dance with the two golden era greats.

Yes, Gene was a lefty, but as you point out, he didn't make a huge deal out of it, along with the other great actors you bring up. He was too smart, and knew better than to alienate at least half of the movie-going public. He did get involved with the HUAC/Joe McCarthy stuff, but at the time, almost everyone in Hollywood did.

As the famous last line of Some Like It Hot goes, "nobody's perfect."

SXViper
March 19th, 2007, 04:13 PM
That was the thing with the actors of the past. They just acted for the most part. There politics were there own buisness and they never tried to drag others into a media war. They were respectful enough of each other and never really got into a public war of words.

The actors of today on another hand think that just because they make movies that they are right in there thinking and that we should listen to them even though most have probably never researched on the stuff they are talking about.

Stumpy
March 19th, 2007, 04:50 PM
The actors of today on another hand think that just because they make movies that they are right in there thinking and that we should listen to them even though most have probably never researched on the stuff they are talking about.

I remember an incident in the early eighties that was totally ridiculous. In those days, a lot of family farms were going under because of various circumstances. Congress called Jessica Lange, who had played in a movie about family farms called "Country", to testify about the plight of family farms. She probably didn't know any more about family farming than my 3-year-old granddaughter, who lives in a Dallas suburb. But that was so typical of what passes for our political "leadership".

DukePilgrim
April 12th, 2007, 02:43 PM
Watched this over the Easter Break. After viewing it again I think I appreciate why it didnt set the box office on fire. It has some nice moments but it does seem a bit disjointed for lack of a better word.

When you consider the running time at 129 minutes which is long for Ford I would have thought that it would have been structured better.

I think the downbeat ending didnt help either.

A Fair to Good movie.


Mike

Stumpy
April 12th, 2007, 02:54 PM
This is my favorite war story with the Duke. Great supporting cast also.

DukePilgrim
April 12th, 2007, 06:38 PM
Hi Jim

Its still can be your favourite. I just think the film could have been stronger. Maybe it was rushed or Ford was rusty with it being his first movie after the war who knows. It is definitely authentic with Spig Weade as one of its advisers.


Mike

Chisum
May 11th, 2007, 10:50 PM
The Ghost Soldiers is an excellent book. It gives the true perspective of what was going on. Unfortunately we are losing over one thousand WWII Vets per day. Many came home and never told their families about what happened and what they went through. We are losing a large portion of untold history with each passing.

If you have a dad or a grandfather and you haven't taken the time to ask them about the war, do it before its too late.

DakotaSurfer
May 12th, 2007, 01:18 AM
I can certainly understand why some stories are not being told. I sat down with a WWII vet when I was in the military and the stories he told me ran shivers up my spine. The Japanese treated our guys horribly in their prison camps. Beaten, whipped, starved, dehydrated, manipulated and much more. I can see why many of our old vets won't tell the stories.

My father-in-law served in WWII, he had a lot of friends that spent time in some of those camps. He hated the Japanese to the day he died. But he did leave me with a funny story that I tell where ever I can.

He used to run an Old Texaco gas station which he later converted to a NAPA store. There is another business in town, a factory that makes bearings and such for big equipment. The factory saw some hard times about 20 years ago and was eventually bought by the Japanese. Shortly after they bought it, they sent a delegation to our city to check out the plant and to check things out so to speak. It kind of on the edge of town and not easy to find. As they wer driving down the main road they stopped in NAPA store to get directions. They asked my father-in-law: "Where is NTN" With their back accent it took him a couple times to figure out what they were asking. When he did figure it out, he looked at them with a straight face and replied: "You found Pearl Harbor easy enough didn't you?" They didn't say a word, just walked out and drove down the road. True story... I swear!

REASR
May 12th, 2007, 11:34 AM
Dakota

Didn't you get the memo.........they apoligised :yeaahh:

DakotaSurfer
May 12th, 2007, 09:18 PM
My father-in-law never accepted it... what was done to his friends, he swore he'd never allow them in his shop. He lived through it, we didn't, but I can see where he's coming from. I lost friends on 9/11 and since then in Iraq.

REASR
May 12th, 2007, 10:25 PM
FRIEND
Neither DO I

I stand with your folks and will,ALWAYS.
Take that to the bank.

Rick

cchoate
May 22nd, 2007, 09:54 PM
I saw this one last night on TCM. The photography is fantastic. This movie is extremely realistic from a visual standpoint.

WaynamoJim
May 28th, 2007, 11:35 PM
I can certainly understand why some stories are not being told. I sat down with a WWII vet when I was in the military and the stories he told me ran shivers up my spine. The Japanese treated our guys horribly in their prison camps. Beaten, whipped, starved, dehydrated, manipulated and much more. I can see why many of our old vets won't tell the stories.

My father-in-law served in WWII, he had a lot of friends that spent time in some of those camps. He hated the Japanese to the day he died. But he did leave me with a funny story that I tell where ever I can.

He used to run an Old Texaco gas station which he later converted to a NAPA store. There is another business in town, a factory that makes bearings and such for big equipment. The factory saw some hard times about 20 years ago and was eventually bought by the Japanese. Shortly after they bought it, they sent a delegation to our city to check out the plant and to check things out so to speak. It kind of on the edge of town and not easy to find. As they wer driving down the main road they stopped in NAPA store to get directions. They asked my father-in-law: "Where is NTN" With their back accent it took him a couple times to figure out what they were asking. When he did figure it out, he looked at them with a straight face and replied: "You found Pearl Harbor easy enough didn't you?" They didn't say a word, just walked out and drove down the road. True story... I swear!

You know the main reason they treated our guys and the Brits so horribly? Because they had absolutely no respect for them. Why? Because they surrendered and to the Japanese, that was weakness and cowardly. They think they should've fought to the last man or killed themselves and die honorably. Honorably? Look how many Japs uselessly died and never saw home again because of honor.

REASR
June 4th, 2007, 09:10 AM
"NO poor dumb B**tard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb B**tard die for his."
Gen. Geo. Patton

DakotaSurfer
June 4th, 2007, 10:33 AM
You know the main reason they treated our guys and the Brits so horribly? Because they had absolutely no respect for them. Why? Because they surrendered and to the Japanese, that was weakness and cowardly. They think they should've fought to the last man or killed themselves and die honorably. Honorably? Look how many Japs uselessly died and never saw home again because of honor.

I see what your saying but these atrocities were happening while the war was going on... there was no dishonor yet since they hadn't surrendered yet, but they were getting their butts kicked all over the Pacific. Once the war was over they just abandoned the camps and left our people to die or starve that's why we had to do a massive search for the camps because we knew the Japs abandoned all prisoners. They didn't even have respect for themselves, committing suicide was some sort of twisted honor to them.

The Ringo Kid
September 11th, 2007, 07:00 PM
As far as this film goes, I like it alot and it's in my top 20 favorite war movies. Great cast and great interaction with the characters. From the first time I saw this movie till recently, I have seen this one at least 30 times over the years and still never tire of it.

I noticed that the Duke also had stubble in this film as it was mentioned elsewhere that the only movie he had hair on his face in was in: Back To Bataan.

chester7777
September 24th, 2007, 02:26 AM
This film still ranks up there as one of my favorites.

I don't think I've ever seen posters for They Were Expendable until now -

2092

The second one is a 1950 reissue -

2093

kilo 6
May 25th, 2008, 09:32 PM
Hard to imagine the courage to be on a small boat attacking much larger ships.

ethanedwards
June 16th, 2008, 08:53 PM
In our recent poll, this movie,
was voted Duke's best war movie.
Although the film flopped at the box office,
let's hear your comments about it,
particularly from members, who have yet
to join in on this discussion.

Dukesfan
June 17th, 2008, 07:27 AM
Itīs one of my two favourite War Movies! - The other one is "In Harmīs Way"...

I like this kind of melancholic mood the movie creates, whenever I watch it. It is so sad to see the people, who are withdrawn from the Philippines, to leave their comrades and friends or to see their comrades die in war. The movie is a wonderful piece of art in black and white and I could not imagine it in color.

QuietManinMinn
June 30th, 2008, 11:35 PM
To me, They Were Expendable, is a reminder of just how unprepared America was going into WWII. With the major losses at Pearl Harbor, the Pacific Fleet was so decimated, that the Phillipinnes and the Asiatic Fleet (mostly little better than mothballed WWI ships) had to be abandoned, and the soldiers and sailors left to defend themselves as best as they could. Yet, at the same time the film DID have a message of hope - unlike what has been said in previous posts. The people of the Phillipinnes and Americans were united in a common struggle, there were new advances that would prove themselves in the Pacific War - the PT Boats, and through this struggle the brass in Washington with their WWI mindset saw that the PT Boat, and the submarine would be a decisive addition to fighting the war.

The movie also showed the toll of all the elements in war - the people, the military, those left behind (and they included women and dependants - i.e. the Nurses), and what lay ahead in POW camps, and the WILL to come back and retake the islands and throw the invaders out. As it showed the toll of the old versus the new - perhaps best shown through Russell Simpson, the old man that came to the Phillipinnes when Americans first came there in 1898, and stayed and most likely perished - as the almost worthless Asiatic Fleet also mostly perished. This was a new war, and the old was gone, and a happier time was ended, and it was a salute to those times, yet acknowledging that they were over, and an all out effort would need to be made to turn everything around for victory.

Unfortunately, in the end, the film did get released as the war closed, and Americans were tired of war, and that is the only reason, I believe, that it flopped. I suspect had the war lasted longer, this would have been perhaps the MOST remembered film for WHY are we fighting.

I loved the film, and it certainly showed the spirit, resolve, and will to win of the people, and the indominatable American that can come back from great defeat and in a short short time send the Japs running. We could sure use an extra large portion of that resolve and spirit today methinks.

The Quiet Man

captain dan
July 1st, 2008, 10:27 AM
This movie had a large effect on me as a young man. The hoplessness of the men,and women
was awful. When the last plane left we all now NOW what happened to most of the men and women that were left behind. Don't we all wonder what happened to Donna Reeds character, and that in the future she and John Waynes Character ever met again.
There really not knowing what happen to the other on was one of the realities of the
time.

chester7777
October 29th, 2008, 01:00 AM
Speaking of PT boats . . . . enjoy

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7693407296698216570&hl=en

http://3.gvt0.com/ThumbnailServer2?app=vss&contentid=3515a66fe4ccdfeb&offsetms=280000&itag=w320&hl=en&sigh=5vxWm_eAAI_lcble-BkHoiPJAac (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7693407296698216570&hl=en)
Trailhead: PT Boat 658 (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7693407296698216570&hl=en)
Feb 15, 2008 During World War II PT Boats, wooden craft armed to the teeth, fought in all avenues of the war. Years passed and they were slowly rep...

dukefan1
October 29th, 2008, 03:31 AM
That was really an awesome story. I'm so glad you found it and shared it here. I didn't think, being made of plywood, that there were any PT Boats left after all these years. I would love to be able to step aboard that craft and feel the history. And to listen to their stories they would tell? Priceless!

Mark

ethanedwards
October 29th, 2008, 04:21 AM
Great Video Jim.Thanks for posting.
What a great project and doesn't the boat look superb?

ShortGrub
October 29th, 2008, 06:02 PM
That was an excellent video on the PT boat. If it was on the east coast I would see it. Maybe one day I'll get out west again.
Thanks again for posting the video.

Stumpy
June 27th, 2009, 06:22 PM
Moderator Chester and I exchanged opinions in another thread that this was our favorite Duke war movie.

I think the single most remarkable aspects of "They Were Expendable" were its' timing, plot and direction.

As we know, there was a lot of effort by all parties in WW2 to show the rightness of their particular cause. Most films were pure propaganda pieces designed to raise the spirits of one's own citizens. Thus, most American war films made during the time actual combat was taking place (Dec '41 until Aug '45) invariably showed our side as the good guys and the other side as the bad guys. Usually, the movies showed our brave lads winning the contest (even when they weren't). "They Were Expendable" didn't do that -it showed MacArthur being evacuated from Corregidor to prevent his capture by the Japanese and Montgomery/Wayne being flown out to help train new PT crewmen and design better boats.

According to the filmography, shooting began in March and ran through June 1945. The war with Japan didn't end until Aug '45, after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Therefore, neither the writer nor John Ford knew how the war would end when this movie was made. As Ford was a naval officer during WW2, he would have had every incentive to make the usual propaganda piece but he didn't, which was to his credit.

JohnChisum
October 31st, 2009, 03:56 PM
I watched this one recently for the first time and I liked it a lot. I agree with the positive critics of this movie. Like in other Ford Movies the Black/White photography is excellent as well.

kevin k
November 16th, 2009, 02:32 AM
best scene-dad[russell simpson]and his dog,smoking and holding his rifle in his rocker on his porch waiting for the jappanease

chester7777
November 16th, 2009, 10:49 AM
Second best scene;

When the song ""Marcheta" was playing and Duke dances with Donna Reed, dancing in the moonlight knowing how desperate the situation really is.

Chester :newyear:

dan stapel
November 23rd, 2009, 11:12 AM
A really great Duke movie! It reminds me of the way our country USED to be! I am very sick of everyone always trying to be politically correct.
We need more people like the Duke was. I am becoming quite concerned about the way our country is heading. Sorry for preaching but I am very concerned.

dan stapel
July 13th, 2010, 04:46 AM
A great movie. Robert Montgomery was a Lt. Commander during WW3.
John Wayne played his wonderful self. Who wouldn't like to have a fling with Donna Reed. Ward Bond has too small a part. I think he is great also.
I have watched this movie over and over.

ethanedwards
July 13th, 2010, 05:36 AM
Ward Bond has too small a part.
This may have been due to the fact that not long before the film,
Ward had shattered a leg in a car accident, and had to be filmed from the waist up,
therefore decreasing a more active role.

I have also taken this opportunity
to update the Trivia and Goofs section, in the initial review.

dan stapel
July 14th, 2010, 08:18 PM
Thank you for the info in regards to Ward Bond. I was a bit down when Ward Bond and the others walked off to who noes what. Perhaps a prison camp or worse.When I was in the service we had a teck. Sgt who was on the Bataan Death march. He was not all there and I felf sorry for him.

ringo kid
July 15th, 2010, 05:35 AM
a classic war movie and one of john wayne's best performances,and his best war film

Redcap
July 18th, 2010, 05:10 AM
I always enjoy this film. Robert Montgomery, John Wayne and Ward Bond always seem to make things very believable.

Redcap

lasbugas
April 1st, 2011, 01:56 PM
Lobby Card Mexicaine

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lasbugas
May 7th, 2011, 11:57 AM
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lasbugas
December 3rd, 2012, 02:57 PM
http://i47.servimg.com/u/f47/11/97/59/03/wayne_44.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=11379&u=11975903)

lasbugas
December 4th, 2012, 02:27 PM
http://i67.servimg.com/u/f67/11/97/59/03/wayne128.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=1757&u=11975903)

Hawkswill
December 4th, 2012, 02:34 PM
HAH, Larry, you found one with Ward in it......super. Thanks. I am looking for the one where he was on a crutch and he and Duke said their goodbyes.
KEITH

lasbugas
December 5th, 2012, 02:08 PM
http://i67.servimg.com/u/f67/11/97/59/03/capt-110.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=1759&u=11975903)

The Tennesseean
December 5th, 2012, 02:48 PM
You know, this is "minutia" at it's best, but the 2 real-life characters (Donna Reed's and John Wayne's characters) the movie circled around kinda "semi-romantically," allegedly sued everyone connected with ALL aspects of the film.

According to the trivia section of IMDb, because of their objection to the "romantic" aspects of the film, studios had to add the familiar disclaimer "Any similarity to actual persons or events, is purely coincidental"

Well...that's untrue. This "disclaimer" was shown at either the beginning or ending of films (sometimes BOTH) as early as 1930...

I know its not earth-shattering, but I thought it was interesting!

Hawkswill
December 5th, 2012, 03:03 PM
Larry, Mon Ami, you found a big pic of Ward with Brick and Duke........you are a doll! Thank you SO much....see the look on Duke's face, that is of a friend glad that his best friend can act again after a long hiatus of recooping from an almost severed leg! Now, if you EVER run into the one of Ward and Duke together just after that one, I would go to France to shake your hand..or give you a hug if you don't mind hugs, whenever I can afford it, LOL! Seriously, first large pic I have seen of that except for screen caps I make. LOVE IT, Thanks again, Larry!

You are right, Russ, very interesting. KEITH WOW!

Hawkswill
December 5th, 2012, 04:43 PM
Larry, you probably got the only really good one. One shows Duke about to clap Ward on the back. But when he and Ward grab each other, Ward turns toward Duke and you can't see his face. Will put that here. There IS one good one when Ward turns back and Brick is putting the binoculars on him. I will try to get it on here also.

Thanks again for the other one. If you ever run into one like these, it would be great to have for me. This really shows the love the two men had for each other. Too bad Ward's face is not shown......wish I could dolly the camera around just a tad!......don't know how well that will translate, LOL!

Duke is about to clap Ward on the back...see how he is looking at him? Don't think that is the look of a superior officer.

http://i1269.photobucket.com/albums/jj582/Hawkswill/They%20Were%20Expendable/vlcsnap-2012-12-05-16h12m41s25.png

This is the really good one except for the camera angle, darn it. If that picture doesn't say a thousand words! I can almost hear Duke say, Well ya made it ya big Palooka, ya really did, or something of the sort, and Ward thanking him for standing by him.

http://i1269.photobucket.com/albums/jj582/Hawkswill/They%20Were%20Expendable/vlcsnap-2012-12-05-16h12m53s240.png

This is probably the absolute best. Afraid it won't be available in stills though. They held onto each other for quite a bit there. Amazing that neither of them cried!

http://i1269.photobucket.com/albums/jj582/Hawkswill/They%20Were%20Expendable/vlcsnap-2012-12-05-16h15m06s29.png

Sorry for the bars yall, but that is the only way I know to do these things, LOL. Thanks once more, Larry, KEITH

wtrayah
December 5th, 2012, 04:52 PM
Not many movies out there about the PT boats, thats what made it a hit with me! It seems a little to long for me, but still a great war movie!

Hawkswill
December 5th, 2012, 05:46 PM
Not many movies out there about the PT boats, thats what made it a hit with me! It seems a little to long for me, but still a great war movie!


Well, have to agree with you there WT, but I just kept looking for Ward. I read PT109 before I saw the movie. Book was better, but the movie was OK. When JFK hit the dock because of his motor failing when he threw her in reverse reminds me of when I used to bring our ski boat in to dock beside the houseboat. I did the same thing. Head on into the dock full speed, swing the wheel and throw her into reverse.....just slide the side right up to the dock to moor her. Thank goodness Mom and Dad kept that old Evinrude in good shape cause she never failed me like JFK's did. They also built a mini version of a PT Boat before we and another family built a huge houseboat in our front yard. Had to get a navy trailer to haul her down the long winding driveway, and had to cut down about 10 huge pines, (before the pine beetle came through GA and I had to cut them ALL down on 2 acres!) Anyway, I was just awestruck at what PT Boats accomplished against much larger targets.......boy, you had to have real guts to be a PTer. Mom and Dad used the Elco 80 footer plans and scaled it down, of course no gun emplacements or torpedo racks were used, LOL. That old boat would take any kind of pounding, she was designed for it. KEITH

lasbugas
February 24th, 2013, 05:54 AM
http://i77.servimg.com/u/f77/11/97/59/03/wayne915.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=12169&u=11975903)

lasbugas
October 16th, 2013, 04:36 PM
http://i58.servimg.com/u/f58/11/97/59/03/wayne159.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=14033&u=11975903)

lasbugas
October 22nd, 2013, 01:41 PM
http://i58.servimg.com/u/f58/11/97/59/03/wayne245.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=14119&u=11975903)

The Irish Duke
November 2nd, 2013, 01:49 AM
They were expendable, I thought it was good but could have benefited from being more story focused as most of Ford's films are rather than being full of war footage which often goes on far too long in war films from this era.

lasbugas
December 9th, 2013, 02:46 PM
http://i58.servimg.com/u/f58/11/97/59/03/wayne680.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=14557&u=11975903)

lasbugas
December 17th, 2013, 02:51 PM
http://i58.servimg.com/u/f58/11/97/59/03/wayne767.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=14644&u=11975903)

lasbugas
July 23rd, 2014, 01:31 PM
http://i39.servimg.com/u/f39/11/97/59/03/a_way221.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=16475&u=11975903)

ringo kid
July 25th, 2014, 06:33 PM
was'nt donna reed beautiful

lasbugas
September 27th, 2014, 05:43 AM
http://i39.servimg.com/u/f39/11/97/59/03/photo352.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=16779&u=11975903)